Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Phishing attacks take a new twist

Filed under
Security

In recent months, the researchers at security software company Websense detected a rise in schemes involving malicious programs known as keyloggers, according to the March phishing trends report released Wednesday by the Anti-Phishing Working Group.

The technology, which records the keystrokes of people using infected machines, could be designed to help phishers stay one step ahead of honest folk. In the past, attackers have relied mainly on e-mail messages that lure victims to malicious Web sites, where they are duped into disclosing logins and usernames for banking sites and other sensitive online accounts. The messages are typically spoofed to look like they come the bank or other trusted provider.

The keylogger programs are built specifically to capture login names and passwords for online bank accounts and to send them to the attackers, Websense Security Labs said. They typically exploit vulnerabilities in Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser program.

Each week in March and February, Websense uncovered as many as 10 new keylogger variants and more than 100 new Web sites set up to infect computers with them. That's up from November and December, when the company's researchers identified an average of one-to-two new variants and 10 to 15 Web sites per week.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Head 2 Head: Android OS vs. Chrome OS

A large part of Google’s OS success hasn’t been because of its awesomeness. No. Frankly, we think nothing speaks louder than the almighty dollar in this world. But both are “free,” right? So this is tie? Not really. Although Android is technically free since Google doesn’t charge device makers for it, there are costs associated with getting devices “certified.” Oh, yeah, and then there’s Apple and Microsoft, both of which get healthy payouts from device makers through patent lawsuits. Microsoft reportedly makes far more from Android sales than Windows Phone sales. You just generally don’t see the price because it’s abstracted by carriers. Chrome OS, on the other hand, actually is pretty much free. A top-ofthe-line Chromebook is $280, while a top-of-the-line Android phone full retail is usually $600. We’re giving this one to Chrome OS because if it’s generally cheaper for the builder, it’s cheaper for you. Read more

Kodi (XBMC Media Center) 14.2 Officially Released, Kodi 15 “Isengard” Is On Its Way

The Kodi development team, through Nathan Betzen, had the pleasure of announcing today, March 28, the immediate availability for download of the second and last maintenance release for Kodi 14 (codename Helix), before they continue with the development cycle for the upcoming release, Kodi 15, dubbed Isengard. Read more

Debian 8 Jessie Installer Now Supports Running a 64-bit Linux Kernel on a 32-bit EFI

The Debian Installer team had the pleasure of announcing on March 27 that the second Release Candidate (RC) version of the Debian 8.0 "Jessie" installer is now available for download and testing. The RC2 version of the installer brings a great number of improvements and fixes. Read more

First Look at GNOME 3.16

The highly anticipated GNOME 3.16 desktop environment for Linux kernel-based operating systems has been announced on March 26, 2015, and has been declared by the GNOME development team as the best GNOME release yet. Of course, we wanted to give GNOME 3.16 desktop environment a try and see for ourselves the new features, apps, and improvements. Read more