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Enlightenment 0.20.2 Linux Desktop Environment Is Out to Fix over 10 Bugs

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GNU
Linux

The developers of the lightweight and modern Enlightenment desktop environment announced on December 28, 2015, the immediate availability for download of the second point release in the Enlightenment 0.20 series.

According to the release notes, which we've attached at the end of the article for reference, Enlightenment 0.20.2 is here to fix over 10 issues that were either discovered by the Enlightenment's developers or reported by users since the previous maintenance release, Enlightenment 0.20.1.

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today's howtos and leftovers

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