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Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa - A wilted flower

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I have decided. From now on, no more mercy. I am not going to waste my time and patience and good mood trying to debug stupidity anymore. If and when any distribution starts its live test session with so much as a tiniest network-related glitch, be it Samba, printing, a copy operation or anything or that sort, I will terminate the testing immediately and report back with the most scathing review and a perfect zero score. I've had enough of this half-assed QA, rushed releases, and problems that do not belong in 2015. Bloody Samba copy. Network bugs that I had reported nine months ago and have been floating around the Web for a solid couple of years. GTFO.

To my great disappointment, but not entirely surprisingly, Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa sucks, just like the rest of them. All of them. The most horrible season of distros there ever was this side of the Necromancer multiverse. All the hard work and love, gone in one fell swoop of neglect. Creating distributions is a responsibility. It's not a jerkfest competition who gets their git commit in faster. Yes, blame Realtek. It's always someone ELSE's responsibility. My day is ruined now, thank you. Rosa, 0/10. Total fail. Next please.

P.S. Adding this little comment a few days after I wrote the article and CALMED down - I will probably give Rosa another chance eventually, the same way I did with openSUSE, Fedora and friends. However, my initial impression stays. What makes everything even more disappointing is that Rosa is based on the LTS crop, so we shouldn't be seeing too much pain and trouble. Alas, whatever has changed under the hood hath ate my hamster. Regressions are like a kick to the gonads. The full effect does not immediately register. But I'm still hurting on the inside. Still hurting.

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