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  • Voice of the masses: 2015 was the year of Linux and open source software. What next?

    It’s the start of a new year here in the Shire, and later this week we’re going to record the first episode for series 4 of our podcast. We’ve left this a little late, but here’s the first voice of the masses of 2016. Over on ZDNet.com, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes, “In 2015, Microsoft embraced Linux, Apple open-sourced its newest, hottest programming language, and the cloud couldn’t run without Linux and open-source software. So, why can’t people accept that Linux and open source have won the software wars?”

  • Welcome to the 2015 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards
  • Goodbye Microsoft (MSFT) and Apple Inc. (AAPL), Here Comes Linux

    A Journalist from Veteran technology, Dan Gillmor said, I had to install Linux a number of times over a span of years and went back either to the Mac or Windows. The reason was there were many loop holes in this operating system. It didn’t have much of those applications to support what I need to do. It was complicated for everyday use. As the time passed by, it just got better and better and then it was time to finally switch to Linux in the year 2012.

  • Switching to Linux, saying goodbye to Apple and Microsoft

    Veteran technology journalist Dan Gillmor's been using GNU/Linux since 2012, switching away from all the "control freak" services, tools and software that he'd grown used to over decades of computing.

  • Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness

    So keeping this is mind the retrace server is an important tool for us and one that at least gives us a decent indication of how we are doing with quality. But we can always do better so we will keep reviewing the reports we get through the ABRT and retrace systems and I also do strong recommend any application or library maintainers out there to look into what major issues are reported against their own modules.

  • Tracking Bugs & Making Fedora Workstation More Stable

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has written a blog post today about Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness.

    Schaller wrote about how the overall consensus of Fedora Workstation with its few releases now is that its very stable -- much better than the older Fedora Linux releases. I certainly agree so -- at least if using the GNOME-based desktop of Fedora Workstation -- that Fedora 21 and newer have been rock solid.

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3 tips for organizing your open source project's workflow on GitHub

Managing an open source project is challenging work, and the challenges grow as a project grows. Eventually, a project may need to meet different requirements and span multiple repositories. These problems aren't technical, but they are important to solve to scale a technical project. Business process management methodologies such as agile and kanban bring a method to the madness. Developers and managers can make realistic decisions for estimating deadlines and team bandwidth with an organized development focus. Read more

How will the GDPR impact open source communities?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was approved by the EU Parliament on April 14, 2016, and will be enforced beginning May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC which was designed "to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy." The aim of the GDPR is to protect the personal data of individuals in the EU in an increasingly data-driven world. Read more

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!