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  • Voice of the masses: 2015 was the year of Linux and open source software. What next?

    It’s the start of a new year here in the Shire, and later this week we’re going to record the first episode for series 4 of our podcast. We’ve left this a little late, but here’s the first voice of the masses of 2016. Over on ZDNet.com, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes, “In 2015, Microsoft embraced Linux, Apple open-sourced its newest, hottest programming language, and the cloud couldn’t run without Linux and open-source software. So, why can’t people accept that Linux and open source have won the software wars?”

  • Welcome to the 2015 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards
  • Goodbye Microsoft (MSFT) and Apple Inc. (AAPL), Here Comes Linux

    A Journalist from Veteran technology, Dan Gillmor said, I had to install Linux a number of times over a span of years and went back either to the Mac or Windows. The reason was there were many loop holes in this operating system. It didn’t have much of those applications to support what I need to do. It was complicated for everyday use. As the time passed by, it just got better and better and then it was time to finally switch to Linux in the year 2012.

  • Switching to Linux, saying goodbye to Apple and Microsoft

    Veteran technology journalist Dan Gillmor's been using GNU/Linux since 2012, switching away from all the "control freak" services, tools and software that he'd grown used to over decades of computing.

  • Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness

    So keeping this is mind the retrace server is an important tool for us and one that at least gives us a decent indication of how we are doing with quality. But we can always do better so we will keep reviewing the reports we get through the ABRT and retrace systems and I also do strong recommend any application or library maintainers out there to look into what major issues are reported against their own modules.

  • Tracking Bugs & Making Fedora Workstation More Stable

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has written a blog post today about Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness.

    Schaller wrote about how the overall consensus of Fedora Workstation with its few releases now is that its very stable -- much better than the older Fedora Linux releases. I certainly agree so -- at least if using the GNOME-based desktop of Fedora Workstation -- that Fedora 21 and newer have been rock solid.

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