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  • Voice of the masses: 2015 was the year of Linux and open source software. What next?

    It’s the start of a new year here in the Shire, and later this week we’re going to record the first episode for series 4 of our podcast. We’ve left this a little late, but here’s the first voice of the masses of 2016. Over on ZDNet.com, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes, “In 2015, Microsoft embraced Linux, Apple open-sourced its newest, hottest programming language, and the cloud couldn’t run without Linux and open-source software. So, why can’t people accept that Linux and open source have won the software wars?”

  • Welcome to the 2015 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards
  • Goodbye Microsoft (MSFT) and Apple Inc. (AAPL), Here Comes Linux

    A Journalist from Veteran technology, Dan Gillmor said, I had to install Linux a number of times over a span of years and went back either to the Mac or Windows. The reason was there were many loop holes in this operating system. It didn’t have much of those applications to support what I need to do. It was complicated for everyday use. As the time passed by, it just got better and better and then it was time to finally switch to Linux in the year 2012.

  • Switching to Linux, saying goodbye to Apple and Microsoft

    Veteran technology journalist Dan Gillmor's been using GNU/Linux since 2012, switching away from all the "control freak" services, tools and software that he'd grown used to over decades of computing.

  • Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness

    So keeping this is mind the retrace server is an important tool for us and one that at least gives us a decent indication of how we are doing with quality. But we can always do better so we will keep reviewing the reports we get through the ABRT and retrace systems and I also do strong recommend any application or library maintainers out there to look into what major issues are reported against their own modules.

  • Tracking Bugs & Making Fedora Workstation More Stable

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has written a blog post today about Fedora Workstation and the quest for stability and robustness.

    Schaller wrote about how the overall consensus of Fedora Workstation with its few releases now is that its very stable -- much better than the older Fedora Linux releases. I certainly agree so -- at least if using the GNOME-based desktop of Fedora Workstation -- that Fedora 21 and newer have been rock solid.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.