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More Android Leftovers

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Android
  • Android N switches to OpenJDK, Google tells Oracle it is protected by the GPL

    The Oracle v. Google legal battle over the use of Java in Android keeps on going, but this week Google made a change to Android that it hopes will let the company better navigate its current legal trouble.

    Google told VentureBeat that it in "Android N," the next major version of Android, it is swapping Android's Java libraries from its own Apache Harmony-based implementation to one based on Oracle's OpenJDK—yes that Oracle, the same company suing Google. OpenJDK is the "official" open source version of the Java Platform, and Oracle makes it available under the GPL with a linking exception.

  • 2016 Technology of the Year Finalist: Android Auto

    Ever wonder why the tiny little Android-powered computer constantly riding around with you in your car is subjected to a life as a dust collector while you struggle to comprehend the terribly designed infotainment system that resides in the center of your car's dashboard? We feel your pain. Which is why we're so excited by the promise offered up by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

  • Android has a serious bug that looks a lot like Stagefright

More in Tux Machines

Security: Lustre, Aqua Security, Election Security and Reproducible Builds

  • Fix for July's Spectre-like bug is breaking some supers
    High-performance computing geeks are sweating on a Red Hat fix, after a previous patch broke the Lustre file system. In July, Intel disclosed patches for another Spectre-like data leak bug, CVE-2018-3693. Red Hat included its own fixes in an August 14 suite of security patches, and soon after, HPC sysadmins found themselves in trouble. The original report, from Stanford Research Computing Center, details a failure in LustreNet – a Lustre implementation over InfiniBand that uses RDMA for high-speed file and metadata transfer.
  • Aqua Security Launches Open-Source Kube-Hunter Container Security Tool
    Aqua Security has made its new Kube-hunter open-source tool generally available, enabling organizations to conduct penetration tests against Kubernetes container orchestration deployments. Aqua released Kube-hunter on Aug.17, and project code is freely available on GitHub. Rather than looking for vulnerabilities inside of container images, Kube-hunter looks for exploitable vulnerabilities in the configuration and deployment of Kubernetes clusters. The project code is open-source and can be run against an organization's own clusters, with additional online reporting capabilities provided by Aqua Security.
  • Election Security Bill Without Paper Records and Risk Limiting Audits? No Way.
    The Senate is working on a bill to secure election infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, but, unless amended, it will widely miss the mark. The current text of the Secure Elections Act omits the two most effective measures that could secure our elections: paper records and automatic risk limiting audits. Cybersecurity threats by their very nature can be stealthy and ambiguous. A skillful attack can tamper with voting machines and then delete itself, making it impossible to prove after the fact that an election suffered interference. Paper records ensure that it is possible to detect and quickly correct for such interference. Automatic audits ensure that such detection actually happens.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #173

Android Leftovers

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Receives L1 Terminal Fault Mitigations, Update Now

According to the security advisory published on Monday, the new kernel security update addresses both CVE-2018-3620 and CVE-2018-3646 vulnerabilities, which are known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) or Foreshadow. These vulnerabilities had an impact on normal systems, as well as virtualized operating systems, allowing a local attacker to expose sensitive information from the host OS or other guests. "Multiple researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the way the Intel processor designs have implemented speculative execution of instructions in combination with handling of page-faults. This flaw could allow an attacker controlling an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary (non-user controlled) addresses," reads today's security advisory. Read more