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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 01

    In this episode: Ian Murdoch, creator of Debian, has died. AMD is overhauling its open source driver approach. Linux has been made to run on a PS4. IPv6 is now at 10% adoption, after only 20 years. And there’s an outbreak of common sense at the Dutch Government. All this plus our regular Finds, Brains and Voices sections. Plus, One. More. Thing.

  • Developer: Tizen Community Dinner at FOSDEM 2016

    Last year the event attracted 5000+ attendees and its looks like a similar number for this year. There will be a number of Tizen talks and you will have the opportunity to meet and listen to Tizen developers from all over Europe (and further away). There will be a EFL / Tizen booth where developers can learn about the Tizen ecosystem, available devices and also about coding using EFL.

  • Design Hackfest in Rio de Janeiro

    In a week and a half, a bunch of us that are involved in GNOME design will be heading to Rio de Janeiro, in order to spend some time with the good people at Endless. (If you don’t know them yet, Endless are selling computers for the developing world, all of which run a GNOME-based operating system. Their latest device, the Endless Mini has been getting some good press recently.)

  • Alpine Linux 3.3.1 Officially Released with ownCloud 8.1.5 and Linux Kernel 4.1.15 LTS

    The guys over Alpine Linux have just announced a few minutes ago, January 7, the immediate availability for download of the Alpine Linux 3.3.1 server-oriented operating system.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Receives New Coverage from Analysts at BMO Capital Markets

    BMO Capital Markets started coverage on shares of Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) in a research note issued to investors on Thursday morning, The Fly reports. The brokerage issued an outperform rating on the open-source software company’s stock.

  • Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Goodbye, Debian 8.1

    Goodbye, Debian 8.1 (Jesse). I tried the distro for several months because RHEL clones (Springdale Linux and CentOS, both 7.0 and 7.1) didn't like my legacy nVidia GeForce 6150 SE in this old desktop and it was a pain to fix that. The system still is good enough to do all the work I need to do and performs reasonably well. Debian seemed like a reasonable alternative. I chose to install it with LXDE as the desktop environment which is lightweight and ideal for old systems.

  • Q4OS 2.0.2 Scorpion (Windows-XP Like System) Is Now Available As Beta

    As you may know, Q4OS is a Debian-based Linux system that uses Trinity Desktop as default and mimics Windows XP, while using a Linux Kernel.

  • Canonical needs a firm direction for Ubuntu

    Ubuntu by itself is a great operating system for both desktop and server, but canonical has a grand plan that seems to neglect its best product.

  • Latest Intel Compute Sticks use Skylake and Cherry Trail CPUs

    With its relatively high, $89 (Linux) to $149 (Windows) price, middling Bay Trail processor, and one lonely USB port, the Intel Compute Stick was clearly in need of some improvements. At CES, Intel launched several second-gen versions that add more USB ports, faster 802.11ac 2×2 WiFi, and much faster processors.

  • App: Video Editor Now Available for the Samsung Z3

    Video Editor is an Application that lets you edit video files directly on your Samsung Z3 Tizen handset. You can trim the start and end points of the video as well as being able to reverse the playback if you so wish. After your editing you get to preview and then save if you are happy with your creation.

More in Tux Machines

GTK Graphics

  • GTK Lands A Big Refactoring Of OpenGL Code
    In addition to Red Hat's Benjamin Otte working on a Vulkan renderer for GTK4's GSK, he's also been working on a big refactoring of the OpenGL code that's now been merged to master. OpenGL is very important for GTK4 as it will play a big role in rendering with GSK. With this "large GL refactoring", a big clean-up was done of the OpenGL GDK code, affecting the X11, Win32, Wayland, and Mir code too. Some of the specific work includes no longer using buffer-age information, passing the actual OpenGL context, and simplifying the code. More details via this Git commit.
  • A Vulkan Renderer For GNOME's GTK+ GSK Is In Development
    A Vulkan back-end is in development for GNOME's GTK's tool-kit new GTK Scene Kit (GSK) code. Benjamin Otte has begun experimenting with a Vulkan back-end for GTK's GSK code with GTK Scene Kit being one of the big additions in development for the major GTK+ 4.0 milestone. GSK implements a scene graph to allow for more complex graphical control of widgets and other improvements to its graphics pipeline. GSK was merged back in October and currently uses OpenGL for rendering while there is now a branched Vulkan renderer.

Linux and Graphics

Early Benchmarks Of GCC 7 On Linux x86_64 With An Intel Core i7 6800K

With the GCC 7 compiler having entered its stage three, feature development is basically over so it's a great time to begin running more benchmarks of this big compiler update that will be officially released as GCC 7.1.0 in early 2017. Up today are benchmarks of the latest GCC 7.0 development snapshot compared to GCC 6.2 and GCC 5.4 on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system running Ubuntu 16.10. Read more Also: LLVM's LLD Linker Gets Faster Performance (Parallelized ICF)

KDE Leftovers

  • 7 Things to do After Installing KDE Plasma
    Even for other Linux users, KDE Plasma can seem like a different operating system. Except for a few standards like LibreOffice, the apps are different, and so is the design philosophy, which tends to cram in every possible feature. As a result, once they install, users are likely to wonder what to do next.
  • KDE Framworks 5 Content Snap Techno
    In the previous post on Snapping KDE Applications we looked at the high-level implication and use of the KDE Frameworks 5 content snap to snapcraft snap bundles for binary distribution. Today I want to get a bit more technical and look at the actual building and inner workings of the content snap itself. The KDE Frameworks 5 snap is a content snap. Content snaps are really just ordinary snaps that define a content interface. Namely, they expose part or all of their file tree for use by another snap but otherwise can be regular snaps and have their own applications etc. KDE Frameworks 5’s snap is special in terms of size and scope. The whole set of KDE Frameworks 5, combined with Qt 5, combined with a large chunk of the graphic stack that is not part of the ubuntu-core snap. All in all just for the Qt5 and KF5 parts we are talking about close to 100 distinct source tarballs that need building to compose the full frameworks stack. KDE is in the fortunate position of already having builds of all these available through KDE neon. This allows us to simply repack existing work into the content snap. This is for the most part just as good as doing everything from scratch, but has the advantage of saving both maintenance effort and build resources.
  • Calligra 3.0 Is Ready As A Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 Office Suite
    It's been quite a while since last having anything to report on the KDE Calligra open-source graphics/office suite while surprisingly this morning it was pleasant to see Calligra 3.0 tagged for release.
  • KDE Applications 16.12 Up to Release Candidate State, Final Arrives December 15
    The KDE development team was proud to announce the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment. Work on KDE Applications 16.12 started about a month ago, on November 10, when the third and last maintenance update of the current stable KDE Applications 16.08 release was announced, marking the end of life of the series. Until today, KDE Applications 16.12 received a Beta development version, tagged as build 16.11.80, and now we're seeing the Release Candidate, tagged as build 16.11.90.