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today's leftovers

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  • KDE and Open Source

    Among the many new experiences I have discovered so far, contributing to a project that is devoted to helping other people brings about an unstoppable drive of happiness. The thought of knowing that something that I did was going to benefit someone else in this world is the best feeling and this made me feel more rewarded and fulfilled about my life.

  • KDE's Akonadi Continues To Be Developed In The KF5 World

    While the KDE Akonadi PIM storage service has been criticized as being slow, among other complaints, it's continuing to be developed and improved upon in the Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5 world.

  • Improving my Gtk and Music knowledge

    During the past few weeks I have studied about how to work with Gtk. It was necessary since I didn’t have so many experience with it. Also, I have taken a time to understand how Gnome Music works.

  • Arch Wins First of Two Round Poll

    The voting is over in the first round of our annual GNU/Linux distro poll, which sought an answer to the simple question, “What Linux distro do you currently use most?” The result was a complete surprise, at least to us. By a decisive margin, you voted for Arch Linux. The poll was certainly one for the record books. By the time it was closed to voting, a total of 5,784 of you had cast votes, more than double from any previous FOSS Force poll. The poll was online for approximately one week.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/1

    This is the first review of the year – and will cover the four snapshots 20151231, 20160101, 20160105 and 20160107.

  • Fosscomm 2015 at Athens

    My second and I believe most important presentation, this year, was about the excellent QA tool actually used to build our distro, “openQA”. As said by it’s motto, “Life is too short for manual testing!”, thus openQA is used to automate testing of the whole distribution (either as a collection or in individual package basis). You can see some test case examples on it’s homepage, you can also fetch the presentation from my github repo (FOSSCOMM_2015 directory) linked in the blog sidebar.

  • Slackware 14.1 Live Edition FullHD Review (KDE, MATE, Xfce) - 20 Years After The First Linux LiveCD
  • Other Letdowns For Linux / Open-Source Users From 2015
  • OpenStack: a .deb guy on (the) board

    [GP] I discovered Linux in 1994, but only in 1996 things were serious. By the time I just finished high school and I applied for a job in a local Internet Service Provider. At 15 years I was well known in the local community as I was installing and maintaining several BBSes, so it wasn’t hard to get the job. I can say it was love at first sight. I started with Slackware (was the first distro), but I moved into redhat first and then debian. When I was working for the IBM Linux Technology Center, I was in charge of helping porting Linux to PowerPC and backporting LVM to make it similar to AIX. Sun was also a good playground as they acquired Cobalt, a hardware appliance based on debian. Then I shifted more towards Enterprise Linux adoption with 6 years in RedHat and then I went to Canonical. I was happy to go back to Debian and Ubuntu community, because I still believe that Ubuntu Developer Summits (UDS) were the real spirit of a Linux community.

  • Debian Fun in December 2015

    December was the eighth month I contributed to Debian LTS under the Freexian umbrella. It was a bit of a funny month since most of the time most open CVEs were already taken care of by other team members (which is nice) but it resulted in me not releasing a single DLA which feels weird.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 Has Received Telephony Improvements And An Updated Thumbnailer

More in Tux Machines

Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

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