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4MLinux 16.0 Enters Beta, Core Edition Uses GCC 5.3.0 and Linux Kernel 4.1.13 LTS

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Linux

A few minutes ago, January 10, we've received an email from Zbigniew Konojacki, the creator of the 4MLinux project, where he informs us about the immediate availability for download of the Beta release of the upcoming 4MLinux 16.0 operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Bootlin, Mediatek, XWayland, and More

  • Embedded Linux Boot time optimization: training and webinar

    Bootlin has been helping its customers optimize the boot time of embedded Linux systems for many years, ensuring that these systems meet their startup time requirements. Thanks to this, Bootlin has accumulated a significant experience in this field.

  • Mediatek Posts 8k Lines Of New Linux Kernel Driver Code For AI Processing Unit Support - Phoronix

    For a number of months Mediatek engineers have been posting some Linux kernel driver code for bringing up the AI Processing Unit (APU) within the MT8192 SoC while out this weekend is the complete patch series at more than eight thousand lines of code. There has been some APU power handling and IOMMU patches previously posted while on Saturday was the complete set of patches for bringing up the MT8192 APU with power control, tinysys controller (a micro-controller on the APU), and middleware support. In total it's 8.1k lines of new kernel code.

  • xwayland 21.1.2.901
    This is a release candidate for Xwayland 21.1.3.
    
    Most notable change is a fix for the GBM backend to work with the
    Nvidia driver series 495.
    
    Unless any major issues turn up, I'm planning to make the final release
    in the coming weeks.
    
    James Jones (1):
           Use EGL_LINUX_DMA_BUF_EXT to create GBM bo EGLImages
    
    Olivier Fourdan (5):
           xwayland/shm: Avoid integer overflow on large pixmaps
           xwayland: Set GLVND driver based on GBM backend name
           xwayland: Clear tablet cursor pending frame cb
           xwayland/test: Don't catch errors in run-piglit.sh
           Bump version to 21.1.2.901
    
    Povilas Kanapickas (1):
           glamor: Fix handling of 1-bit pixmaps
    
    Simon Ser (1):
           xwayland: fix xdg_output leak
    
    git tag: xwayland-21.1.2.901
    
  • XWayland 21.1.3 Nears With Support For NVIDIA 495 Driver's GBM - Phoronix

    The release candidate to XWayland 21.1.3 is out today with just a few changes but made significant by support for the NVIDIA 495 series driver GBM code path. XWayland 21.1.3 is the next point release to this code that is spun out from the upstream X.Org Server for delivering standalone XWayland releases separate from tagged xorg-server versions. XWayland 21.3. has only a handful of fixes like an XDG_Output memory leak fix, fixed handling of 1-bit pixmaps in GLAMOR, avoiding possible integer overflows on large pixmaps, and other maintenance items.

  • Vulkanised Fall 2021 Material Available - Autodesk Has Begun Using MoltenVK - Phoronix

    Last week was the virtual Vulkanised Fall 2021 event hosted by The Khronos Group. The two-day event was focused on all things Vulkan and for those that missed it all of the slide decks and other material are now available. This was a two-day virtual affair focused on the high performance graphics and compute API featuring a current status update around features like ray-tracing and video encode/decode, interesting usages of Vulkan, and related work like Arm's astcenc encoder, HLSL shader compilation, and more.

Dash to Dock now officially supports GNOME 40 (but not GNOME 41)

One of the most criticized things about GNOME 40 is the fact that it broke compatibility with many extensions due to the large number of changes it introduced. Despite this, the extension developers have not given up, so after many months of waiting, Dash to Dock 70 has recently arrived as stable for GNOME 40 compatibility. This means that users no longer have to install Dash to Dock on GNOME 40 manually from the GitHub repository, but can instead go the standard way of going to the corresponding website within the GNOME Extensions site. Read more Also: a href="https://thisweek.gnome.org/posts/2021/10/twig-15/">#15 Sepia and App Updates · This Week in GNOME

Trying Out Ubuntu's New Flutter+Curtin-Powered Desktop Installer Was Disappointing

An effort going on for a while at Canonical has been to develop a new desktop installer for Ubuntu. With the recent Ubuntu 21.10 release they are still using their classic Ubiquity installer by default but have published a new preview build of Ubuntu 21.10 with their new desktop installer option. Here is a look at Ubuntu's forthcoming new installer. With a new daily preview build of Ubuntu's new installer and today's call for feedback on the new installer, I decided to give it a shot with this fresh ISO. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Gaming and the Steam Deck will kill the Windows desktop - TechHQ

    The computer games industry grosses more than the film, music and sports industries, often in combination. It’s the premier sector for innovation in computing, with dedicated teams squeezing out the best performance from today’s and tomorrow’s hardware and software. Put simply, there’s so much money at stake, games developers have to innovate and create literally awesome products to create a return on the substantial investments required to produce an AAA game. The announcement a few months ago that Valve, the company behind Steam, was producing a next-generation handheld gaming platform has started a series of events that will irrevocably change the choice of the operating system for the future’s daily driver desktop. Since time immemorial, Microsoft’s Windows has been the prevailing choice not just for gaming, but for any number of industry given the OS’ pervasive penetration.

  • Humble has a Paradox Bundle up with plenty of strategy games and a Halloween sale | GamingOnLinux

    Ready for more games to keep you warm this coming Winter? Check out the Paradox StrataGems Bundle and there's also a nice Humble Store Halloween sale now live. For the bundle it's a mixture of native Linux games and a few that work well with Steam Play Proton too.

  • PipeWire 0.3.39 Brings Libcamera Plugin Improvements, Better Compatibility For JACK Apps - Phoronix

    PipeWire 0.3.39 continues improving compatibility with JACK applications, offers better Bluetooth device compatibility with more devices now working, its libcamera plug-in has been improved upon, an LD_PRELOAD V4L2 emulation library for running some existing V4L2 targeted applications on top of PipeWire, and the media-session has been moved into a separate module to further its deprecation in favoring it be replaced by WirePlumber.

  • The syslog-ng insider 2021-10: OpenSearch; udp-balancer(); mqtt() destination; process accounting; - Blog - syslog-ng Community - syslog-ng Community

    This is the 95th issue of syslog-ng Insider, a monthly newsletter that brings you syslog-ng-related news.

  • The best open source software of 2021 | InfoWorld [Ed: IDG promoting a bunch of Windows junk and dual-licensed stuff as "Open Source", so you know those "Bossie Awards" are more marketing than substance or partly a PR ploy]

    InfoWorld’s 2021 Bossie Awards recognize the year’s best open source software for software development, devops, data analytics, and machine learning.

  • In Search Of The First Comment | Hackaday

    Are you writing your code for humans or computers? I wasn’t there, but my guess is that at the dawn of computing, people thought that they were writing for the machines. After all, they were writing in machine language, and whatever bits they flipped into the electronic brain stayed in the electronic brain, unless punched out on paper tape. And the commands made the machine do things, not other people. Code was written strictly for computers. Modern programming practice, on the other hand, is aimed firmly at people. Variable and function names are chosen to be long and to describe what they contain or do. “Readability” of code is a prized attribute. Indeed, sometimes the fact that it does the right thing at all almost seems to be an afterthought. (I kid!) Somewhere along this path, there was an important evolutionary step, like the first fish using its flippers to walk on land. Comments were integrated into programming languages, formalizing the notes that coders of old surely wrote by hand in the margins of the paper first-drafts before keying it in. So I went looking for the missing link: the first computer language, and ideally the first program, with comments. I came up empty handed.

  • Open Source: Eclipse Foundation achieves OpenChain conformity [Ed: Automated translation from German]

    The Eclipse Foundation has announced that its development and licensing processes for open source software comply with the international OpenChain ISO 5230 standard. This has existed for almost a year and comes from the OpenChain project. The project is part of the Linux Foundation and has been defining a standard for an open source compliance program in the form of an OpenChain specification for a long time in order to use open source software in companies in accordance with the license. The specification should be used according to the FAQsTo create trust between companies and to make open source predictable, understandable and usable in internal and external supply chains.

  • OPINION: Legacy Social Media: Free as in beer, not as in speech
  • Thomas L. Knapp: Legacy social media: Free as in beer, not as in speech

    Richard Stallman tells us to "think of 'free speech,' not 'free beer'" when discussing the free software movement. The marriage of legacy social media platforms to government censorship reverses that proposition. Use of the services is "free" (actually, you pay with your data and attention), but you only get to say what the politicians tell those platforms to allow you to say.

  • ESP32-Cam Makes A Dandy Motion Detector | Hackaday

    Halloween is right around the corner and just about every Halloween project needs some kind of motion sensor. Historically, we’ve used IR and ultrasonic sensors but [Makers Mashup] decided to use an ESP32-Cam as a motion sensor in his latest animatronic creation. You can see a video of the device and how it works below. The project is a skull that follows you around with a few degrees of motion on a stepper motor. There’s a 3D-printed enclosure to make the hardware assembly easy. The base software was borrowed from [Eloquent Arduino].