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Leftovers: Kernel

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  • GNU Linux-libre Kernel 4.4 Officially Released for Those Who Want 100% Freedom

    The guys over at the GNU Linux-libre project have had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the GNU Linux-libre 4.4 kernel on January 10, 2016.

  • With Skylake Out, It's Becoming Easier To Build A Cheap Haswell Xeon Linux System

    Now that Skylake Xeon processors are appearing at major Internet retailers in sufficient quantities (such as the recently reviewed Intel Xeon E3 1245 v5), prices on older-generation Xeon CPUs are falling further. With prices on DDR3, SSDs, and Haswell-compatible motherboards also continuing to fall, it's possible to build a sufficiently powerful yet cheap Haswell Xeon system.

  • The Intel Graphics Highlights Of The Linux 4.5 Kernel
  • Neat drm/i915 stuff for 4.5

    Kernel version 4.4 is released, it's time for our regular look at what's in store for the Intel graphics driver in the next release.

  • Intel Knights Landing Perf Support Comes To Linux 4.5

    Ingo Molnar has already been sending in his many Git pull requests for the newly-opened Linux 4.5 merge window.

  • Cgroup v2 Is To Be Made Official With Linux 4.5

    The cgroup v2 interface will be made official with the in-development Linux 4.5 kernel.

    Maintainer Tejun Heo sent in the cgroup changes today for the Linux 4.5 merge window. About the new interface he notes, "cgroup v2 interface is now official. It's no longer hidden behind a devel flag and can be mounted using the new cgroup2 fs type. Unfortunately, cpu v2 interface hasn't made it yet due to the discussion around in-process hierarchical resource distribution and only memory and io controllers can be used on the v2 interface at the moment."

  • 4.4 Linux Kernel Long-Term Support Release is Now Available

    Linus Torvalds yesterday released the Linux 4.4 kernel. This is a long-term support (LTS) release, as was determined at the Linux Kernel Summit and announced in October by Greg Kroah-Hartman, who will maintain it for 2 years.

    This release checks in at more than 20.8 million lines of code, which is up considerably from Version 4.1, released in June 2015 with slightly more than 19.5 million lines of code, according to Phoronix. For historical comparison, version 0.01 of the Linux kernel -- released in 1991 -- had just 10,239 lines of code (source: Wikipedia).

  • LinuxChanges

    Summary: This release adds support for 3D support in virtual GPU driver, which allows 3D hardware-accelerated graphics in virtualization guests; loop device support for Direct I/O and Asynchronous I/O, which saves memory and increases performance; support for Open-channel SSDs, which are devices that share the responsibility of the Flash Translation Layer with the operating system; the TCP listener handling is completely lockless and allows for faster and more scalable TCP servers; journalled RAID5 in the MD layer which fixes the RAID write hole; eBPF programs can now be run by unprivileged users, they can be made persistent, and perf has added support for eBPF programs aswell; a new mlock2() syscall that allows users to request memory to be locked on page fault; and block polling support for improved performance in high-end storage devices. There are also new drivers and many other small improvements.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation Grows So Much it Hires a Chief of Staff

The Linux Foundation hired Sheryl Chamberlain to fill the newly-created position of chief of staff. She’ll oversee operational activities for the foundation and be the point of contact between executive management and stakeholders in its numerous open source projects. Previously, Chamberlain was a partner VP at the consulting company Capgemini where she led activities to assist Dell Technologies. Prior to joining Capgemini, she worked at EMC in a variety of roles, including chief operations officer in the corporate office of the CTO. Read more Also:

  • Container Network Interface Project Joins CNCF
    CNI is now the tenth official project that is part of the CNCF. At the Cloud Native Computing Foundation / Kubecon event in March 2017, the CNCF added Dockers' Containerd and CoreOS' rkt container runtimes as the seventh and eighth projects. CNCF itself is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project and is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration and management platform. In a video interview conducted at Kubecon, Chris Aniszczyk, COO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation discussed the importance of CNI and why it would likely become part of the CNCF.
  • Linux Kernels 4.9.29, 4.4.69 and 3.18.54 Released Networking Changes, Many Fixes

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