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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Most enterprises plan to increase mobile app development this year, Red Hat finds

    A full 90 percent of enterprises plan to increase mobile app development this year, according to a survey of 200 IT decision makers from 200 enterprises in the United States and Europe conducted by Vanson Bourne on behalf of Red Hat.

  • Behind-the-scenes: How the FCC migrated to the cloud (Part 2)

    All organizations are familiar with Murphy's Law – the idea that if something can go wrong, it inevitably will. It’s a mantra in IT circles and all the motivation needed to ensure IT organizations are prepared for all possible scenarios. It's likely this very idea was going through the mind of Dr. David Bray, CIO of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, in the early hours of the morning on September 4, 2015, as he watched a truck with 200 servers and 400 terabytes of data driving away from the FCC – and nearly getting stuck in the driveway.

  • Fedora 24 Linux Delayed, the Distribution Will Be Released on May 31, 2016

    Well, it didn't take long for the Fedora developers to change the official release schedule for the upcoming Fedora 24 Linux operating system and delay it for two weeks.

    The initial release schedule of Fedora 24 suggested that the upcoming OS would see the light of day on May 17, 2016, but now it has been postponed for the last day of May, most probably due to some issues that will take a little bit longer to be resolved.

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The 25 biggest events in Linux's 25-year history

You can argue about Linux's official birthday. Heck, even Linus Torvalds thinks there are four different dates in 1991 that might deserve the honor. Regardless, Linux is twenty-five years old this year. Here are some of its highlights and lowlights. Read more Also: 25 Years of Linux: What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been

Today in Techrights

Conferences and Kids

I've taken my daughter, now 13, to FOSDEM in Brussels every year that I had slots there. She isn't a geek, yet enjoys the crowds and the freebies. When I could, I also took my kids to other events, where I was speaking. In this post I'd like to capture my feelings about why children should be part of conferences, and what conferences can do to make this easier. First off, the "why?" Traditional conferences (in all domains, not just software) are boring, ritualized events where the participants compete to see who can send the most people to sleep at once. The real event starts later, over alcohol. It is a strictly adult affair, and what happens at the conf stays at the conf. Now our business is a little different. It is far more participative. Despite our history of finicky magic technologies that seem to attract mainly male brains, we strive for diversity, openness, broad tolerance. Most of what we learn and teach comes through informal channels. Finished is formal education, elitism, and formal credentials. We are smashing the barriers of distance, wealth, background, gender, and age. Read more

50 Essential Linux Applications

If you’re a refugee from Windows, you may be finding the Linux world slightly confusing, wondering how you can get the all same functionality you had in Windows, but still enjoy the freedom that Linux offers. Never fear! Linux is not some scary, difficult to use monster that’s only used by hackers and programmers, it’s actually becoming more and more user friendly every day. Read
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