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Miniature Servers

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Linux
  • High Performance computing and parallel computing amateur linux test lab

    I dabble in trying to build high performance applications, and parallel computing stuff. I don't do a good job at it, but I would like more practice. I tried to conceive of the type of hardware I would like for my continued practice. These are their stories:

    I know from bitcoin mining that some instruction sets are better at somethings, so I'm pretty sure I want two servers, with dual graphics cards. One nvidia, and one ATI (or maybe I'm just an ATI guy but nvidia is kind of sort of blowing them out of the water). I also know I'm probably going to want two Parallella's.

  • Ocean is an amazing Linux based battery-powered, pocket sized wireless server

    Ocean, a mobile server launched by Redwood-based hardware repair company iCracked, can run all Linux-based operating systems that is built on top of the Linux kernel. It can easily fit into your pocket but is capable of being a full-blown battery powered wireless web server.

More in Tux Machines

Oracle's Exadata (GNU/Linux-powered) and VirtualBox 5.2 Beta

  • Oracle Brings Bare Metal Exadata Performance to the Cloud
    Oracle's Exadata Cloud Service price list for non-metered services currently starts at a list price of $55,000 a month. For that price, organizations get the Oracle Database Exadata Cloud Service with a quarter-rack bare-metal Exadata X6 system.
  • Oracle Outs Second VirtualBox 5.2 Beta to Support Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4
    Oracle's Director of Product Management Simon Coter was pleased to announce on Wednesday the release and immediate availability for download of the second VirtualBox 5.2 Beta. VirtualBox 5.2 is currently under heavy development, and a first Beta release was published a week ago, giving users a glimpse at the major new features coming to the open-source and cross-platform virtualization software from Oracle. Focusing on improvements and regression fixes for the first Beta, VirtualBox 5.2 Beta 2 is here today to introduce support for the recently released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 operating system in the Linux Additions component.

The future of Python and when not to use a regex

  • The future of Python: Concurrency devoured, Node.js next on menu
    The PyBay 2017 conference, held in San Francisco over the weekend, began with a keynote about concurrency. Though hardly a draw for a general interest audience, the topic – an examination of multithreaded and multiprocess programming techniques – turns out to be central to the future of Python. Since 2008, the Python community has tried to reconcile incompatibility between Python 2 and newly introduced Python 3. For years, adoption of Python 3 was slow and some even dared to suggest Python didn't have a future. As late as last year, Zed Shaw, an accomplished developer and author of the popular Learn Python the Hard Way, even ventured to opine, "There is a high probability that Python 3 is such a failure it will kill Python." Despite these unsubstantiated odds, Shaw – a polarizing figure for some Pythonistas – this year released a version of his book for Python 3.
  • When not to use a regex
     

    A regex is useful for validating simple patterns and for finding patterns in text. For anything beyond that it’s almost certainly a terrible choice.

Linux: Cloud Foundry, HMM, AMD Radeon and NVIDIA

  • Navigating Cloud Foundry
    This open source platform-as-a-service cloud platform bridges the gap between legacy applications and cloud services. For all the talk about the cloud, many applications continue to run on traditional servers. Hybrid architectures are sometimes the right option, but if you want to move corporate applications onto the Internet, you don’t want to start from scratch. Cloud Foundry, a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) cloud platform, enables enterprises to move older software to the cloud and build new cloud-centric programs using familiar tools and programming languages.
  • HMM Revised Its 25th Time, Seeking Inclusion In Linux 4.14
    Jerome Glisse of Red Hat has published his 25th revision to the Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM) patch series. HMM is about allowing a process address space to be mirrored and for system memory to be transparently used by any device process. With HMM v25, there are more code comments and documentations, fixes to the code, merging the HMM-CDM patches into this patch series, and other improvements.
  • Radeon X.Org Driver Gets Fixed Up To Always Allow Page-Flipping With TearFree
    It's fairly rare these days seeing improvements to the xf86-video-ati DDX: the driver for those running a pre-AMDGPU (GCN 1.2) graphics card with this driver paired with Radeon DRM and not using the generic xf86-video-modesetting driver instead. But if you are using xf86-video-ati and use the "TearFree" feature to try to avoid screen tearing, a number of patches landed today. Michel Dänzer of AMD landed a handful of patches to the xf86-video-ati Git repository today for the Radeon DDX. Notably the patches make for always allowing DRI2 page-flipping to be used with TearFree and the same goes for DRI Present page-flipping with the TearFree option. Long story short, page-flipping should now always work in the TearFree mode.
  • NVIDIA Releases Vulkan 381.26.13 Beta Linux Driver
    NVIDIA's driver team has today released new Vulkan beta drivers for both Windows and Linux. The new NVIDIA Linux Vulkan beta is versioned at 381.26.13, so still not yet re-based to the current 384 series, but these changes should end up being merged for their next feature series to mainline.

Krita 3.2.0 Released

  • Krita 3.2.0 Released
    Later than planned, here’s Krita 3.2.0! With the new G’Mic-qt plugin integration, the smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets and a lot of bug fixes. Read the full release notes for more information!. Here’s GDQuest’s video introducing 3.2.0:
  • Krita 3.2 Released For Leading Open-Source Digital Painting
    The Krita project has today announced version 3.2 is ready of their open-source, cross-platform digital painting program. Krita 3.2 features new G'Mic-qt plugin integration, a smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets, a variety of fixes, and other minor improvements.