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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Why Sustainable Software Needs a Change in the Culture of Science

    Open Source and good practice

    The challenge to the scientific community is how to do the work needed to make software sustainable. Either reducing the amount of work, or bringing together new resources, can make this more successful. The first is often thought of as using good software engineering practices (which has the additional benefit of making the software more likely to be correct), and the second can potentially be satisfied through Open Source communities.

    In some sense, these are both social issues, rather than technical ones. The goal is to encourage software developers, whatever the type of software they are developing, to do the extra work needed to make their own software sustainable and to build or join communities whose members work together on shared code. The task is how to achieve this.

  • NGINX Plus R8 Fully Supports HTTP/2, Field Tests OAuth2

    Fracturing a site’s contents into a plurality of arbitrary domains to improve performance is still being taught as a legitimate practice for Web servers. It remains the best way to get around HTTP 1.1’s maximum limitation of six connections per host, and the, even more, draconian limit of two connections for older browsers such as Internet Explorer 7.

  • In Memoriam of John McCreesh & FOSDEM 2016

    I was about to write about the main topic of this post, namely FOSDEM 2016 when we learned of the death of someone who was a really nice and gentle human being, John McCreesh. For those who may not know John, it’s important to say that while he was not as famous as Ian Murdock, he was definitely one of the pillars of the OpenOffice.org community for long years. He served as a volunteer there in various capacities, but mostly as one of the marketing project lead. During his tenure, he had to deal with complicated situations and several challenges. John was, I already wrote it, a gentle human being. He managed to help build and strengthen the OpenOffice.org community and make it bloom even when times were dire. He was nice, always listening to others, soothing and comforting people around him. John knew the value of peace and moving forward. His origins (he was born in Northern Ireland if I’m not mistaken and his family origins are quite interesting in that regard) and upbringing made him respect anyone who was coming towards him and his welcoming stance gained him many friends and many open source volunteers. In some cases, his generous and kind attitude helped him make people stay in the project even as they had every obvious reasons to leave.

  • VIDEO: Driverless tractors and open-source software

    The Inventors’ Showcase winner, and president of Reimer Robotics, has built a system to move tractors – driverless no less, with grain cart in tow – across a field to a harvesting combine on the go. Reimer’s invention can help producers save time during harvest – and since the software and hardware are open-source – other producers can build on his work and adapt it to their needs.

  • Open-source GPU from Binghamton University could shake up the industry

    GPU's are fantastic tools for completing scientific computational work. They're effective at calculating math that's highly parallel, doing it far faster than any CPU could do alone. And now the GPU is going open-source with Binghamton University's new Nyami architecture that researchers have developed.

  • What's New in 3D Printing, Part II: the Hardware

    This is the second article in what will be a four-part series on the current state of 3D printing compared to how things were three years ago when I wrote my first series on 3D printing. Of course, this is Linux Journal, so the focus will be on Linux and open-source-specific aspects in 3D printing. I won't dwell much on proprietary products. In my last article, I gave a general overview on the state of 3D printing; in this one, I focus on the hardware side.

    If you were to compare 3D printers three years ago to today, probably the first thing you would notice is just how polished and consumer-focused the overall look of the machines are now. Three years ago, most printers were based off the RepRap line of 3D printers. They had a hobbyist look, with 3D-printed gears and other parts combined with nuts and bolts you could get from the hardware store. Those printers that didn't consist of a series of threaded and smooth rods for their structure were made from laser-cut wood. The focus was much more on community and sharing designs freely to improve the quality of the printers as rapidly as possibly while still using parts easily purchased from a hardware store or on-line. Many of the commercial 3D printer offerings at the time also were some form of a RepRap printer sold pre-assembled and calibrated with some refinements and improvements, plus support from the company if anything went wrong.

  • Webinar on real-time IoT data analytics, visualization and collection with open-source Kaa IoT, Apache Cassandra and Apache Zeppelin

    In the course of the webinar we will set up an end-to-end solution comprising Kaa, Apache Cassandra and Apache Zeppelin to demonstrate their cumulative capabilities for collecting, analyzing and visualizing large sets of data in real time.

More in Tux Machines

An introduction to the GNU Core Utilities

These two collections of Linux utilities, the GNU Core Utilities and util-linux, together provide the basic utilities required to administer a Linux system. As I researched this article, I found several interesting utilities I never knew about. Many of these commands are seldom needed, but when you need them, they are indispensable. Between these two collections, there are over 200 Linux utilities. While Linux has many more commands, these are the ones needed to manage the basic functions of a typical Linux host. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's howtos

Open Hardware/RISC-V Latest

  • Brains behind seL4 secure microkernel begin RISC-V chip port
    Last week, the first RISC-V port of its seL4 microkernel was released by the Data61 division of the Australian government's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). seL4 is an open-source and highly secure version of the L4 microkernel that aims to be mathematically proven to be bug free, in that it works as expected as per its specifications. Meanwhile, RISC-V is an open-source instruction-set architecture, and is used as the blueprint for various open-source processor core designs – some of which are now shipping as real usable silicon, such as chips from SiFive and Greenwaves.
  • Dongwoon Anatech Licenses Codasip's Bk3 RISC-V Processor for Motor Control ICs for Mobile Camera
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, announced today that Dongwoon Anatech, a technology leader in analog and power ICs for mobile phones, has selected Codasip’s Bk3 processor and Studio design tool for its next generation family of motor control IC products. Dongwoon Anatech, fabless analog semiconductor specialist, offers a wide range of analog products, including auto-focus driver IC for smartphones, AMOLED DC-DC converter, display power driver IC, and haptic driver IC.