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  • Linux Foundation quietly scraps individual memberships

    "Much of the code in Linux is written by employees paid to do this work, but significant parts of both Linux and the huge range of software that it depends on are written by community members who now have no representation in the Linux Foundation. Ignoring them makes it look like the Linux Foundation is interested only in 'promoting, protecting and standardising Linux and open source software' if doing so benefits their corporate membership rather than the community as a whole. This isn't a positive step," says Garrett in his post.

    The Register has again contacted the Linux Foundation for comment and will update this story if we hear back from them.

  • The Linux Foundation’s Response To Leadership Controversy Is Plain Disappointment

    In response to the recent leadership controversy, the Linux Foundation has come up with an unsatisfactory response. Linux Foundation chief executive Jim Zemlin has written a blog post on the Foundation’s website and talked about irrelevant aspects of the issue.

    In our last article on this issue, fossBytes listed clear points telling why the latest change in community representation is a bad news for Linux and open source. Up until recently, the organization allowed the individual community members to elect two board members and ensure that the voice of Linux users is present at the board decisions — now this clause has been erased from the bylaws.

    Zemlin chose to ignore the concerns and started his response with an irrelevant line: “First, The Linux Foundation Board structure has not changed. The same individuals remain as directors, and the same ratio of corporate to community directors continues as well.”

    His reply ignores facts and lacks some gravity. How can the ratio remain same when Linux community is now not allowed to choose its directors?

    [...]

    I support every word Zemlin has to say against trolling and unacceptable online behavior of the community members. But, Zemlin chooses to drift from the central point of discussion — Is Karen still eligible to run for the board? What about the current situation of the community representation in the Linux Foundation board?

    Over the past years, Linux and other big names in the open source world have embraced the support of corporate executives. This recent step is another move away from the community of many individual bright programmers. I hope the Foundation makes room for common Linux users and restores their voting rights and faith.

  • Are Codes of Conduct dangerous to open source software development?

    Codes of Conduct have often been pushed to create "safer" environments, while opponents sometimes find such codes repressive and suffocating. But are Codes of Conduct a real danger to the development of open source software?

    One developer, fearing for the loss of his job, posted his anonymous response to what he thinks are dangerous Codes of Conduct.

  • Major Linux Kernel 4.5 Update Released For Testing

    The new kernel, version 4.5, includes major driver improvements, including better 3D graphics support for the Raspberry Pi

    Developer Linus Torvalds on Sunday released the first release candidate (RC) for the upcoming Linux 4.5 kernel, including expanded driver and architecture support as well as other updates.

More in Tux Machines

Chromium and Firefox: New Features

  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time. The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time. "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."
  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today
    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla. Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, GCC 7.2

Greg Kroah-Hartman published on Wednesday new maintenance updates for various of the supported Linux kernel branches that he maintains, including the Linux 4.12 series, which appears to have reached end of life. Read more

The ISS just got its own Linux supercomputer

A year-long project to determine how high-performance computers can perform in space has just cleared a major hurdle -- successfully booting up on the International Space Station (ISS). This experiment conducted by Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA aims to run a commercial off-the-shelf high-performance computer in the harsh conditions of space for one year -- roughly the amount of time it will take to travel to Mars. Read more

Qt 5.6.3 Released

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.6.3 has been released today. As always with a patch release Qt 5.6.3 does not bring any new features, just error corrections. For details of the bug fixes in Qt 5.6.3, please check the change logs for each module. Read more