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Leftovers: Games

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Gaming
  • Sexy MF says things related to game programming on Linux, and tells you why you shouldn’t learn C!

    Now, at this point, I have a humble confession to make. I don’t know C! Specifically pointers. I never got into it at a young age, because after life with my Sinclair ZX Spectrum had come to a halt, I didn’t have access to a PC with a C compiler so that I could follow things in a natural progression (and my parents wanted me to get off the computer and focus on my schoolwork – probably the main reason I did so badly there!). I do remember reading about them at the time (in a book I got for my birthday at the time, in fact), but since I couldn’t actually try it out anywhere, they never became part of my bloodstream! This is the main reason I couldn’t actually try out anything from the Abrash book, since the whole thing assumes you’re adept at C! This has been a huge stumbling block in my programming education, since every single book on data structures or graphics programming, or what have you (not to mention websites like this one), assumes you know C. Now, today, where it’s actually taught in school (wasn’t the case back then), let me give you my opinion – I’m glad I never learnt pointers! There’s nothing wrong with understanding indirection, but when you’re trying to think of and implement a particular algorithm, trying to think of what the 0s and 1s are doing inside the computer is just hugely counter intuitive. This is not how human beings think. C was made so that an operating system could be written in it – that is the crux of how pointers came into being, and for some reason that hacker language caught on to become the most prevalent language in the whole world! Of course, it also led a young kid called Linus Torvalds to use it to do it all over again starting in 1991 (incidentally Linus, before the PC, worked on the QL, another member of the Sinclair family, a sort of a “big cousin” to the Spectrum), thanks to which you’re reading this website today, so I guess it wasn’t altogether a bad thing. But I, for one am glad that we’ve moved on to things like Javascript, in today’s day and age, and it makes me happy that we don’t have to worry about what’s zapping in and out of RAM when trying to write a game. Just at that point where those in charge of the Indian education system want their charges to know about nothing else but the syntax of weird things with asterisks in them (it seems, the more asterisks, the better), as if that was important. Trust the fools! Incidentally, I did get hold of a Youtube video about pointers sometime back, and followed it through, and yes, I did finally get what they are (where was that animation back in 1992?), but I guess it’s too late now – Javascript occupies much more of my mind now than C ever will, and I can’t say that makes me unhappy in any way. All along, I knew what [ and ] do in Assembly in any case! I just wish there were more folks like me, who will now have the happy task of porting, in their own minds, all the code in the Abrash book, to whatever their favourite language is, so that in the case of Javascript, wonder of wonders – their browser can show them the joy of a rotating cube! That’s why the exhortations of this article. By the way, I suggest you Youtube for “banana bread” some time – good stuff! This is clearly the future, and you need to get a handle on it.

  • Vagante, a nifty-looking platformer with permadeath, available on Linux

    Fans of challenging platformers with the trendy roguelite appellation might be interested to know that there's something new that they can sink their teeth into. Vagante promises countless hours of procedurally generated fun alone or with friends.

  • Atari Vault, a 100 classic game collection heading to SteamOS & Linux

    This is lovely news, Atari Vault a new official collection of 100 classic games is heading to SteamOS & Linux

  • Escape from Tarkov, the new Russian Survival MMO FPS looks like it's heading to Linux

    Escape from Tarkov is an interesting looking Russian-made action MMO that is apparently going to come to Linux too.

More in Tux Machines

3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux. Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications. Read more

SODIMM-style module runs Linux on VIA’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 SoC

VIA unveiled an SODIMM-style COM based on its Cortex-A9 WM8850 SoC, with 512MB RAM and 8GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, CSI, graphics, USB, and serial ports. The 68.6 x 43mm “SOM-6X50” computer-on-module appears to be VIA’s second-ever ARM COM. Back in Sept. 2015, the company released a 70 x 70mm Qseven form factor QSM-8Q60 COM, based on a 1GHz NXP DualLite SoC. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.