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Was Linus Behind LF Membership Changes?

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Writer journalist Vox Day speculated the other day that Linus Torvalds himself may have been behind the Linux Foundation's elimination of individual memberships from their organization. FOSS Force is back with another poll and quiz today and Eric Hameleers released an updated Slackware Live. Debian update 8.3 was announced Saturday and several reviews warrant a mention.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and KDE: GNOME Shell and Mutter, Qt, Plasma Mobile and Okular for Debian

  • GNOME Shell + Mutter See Changes For Tracking Software Rendering, VNC To Toggle Animations

    GNOME Shell and Mutter saw a set of patches land today for GNOME 3.36 that have been around for a few months and deal with the tracking of software rendering and VNC usage where GNOME Shell should in turn disable animations to ease the rendering workload. The GNOME Settings Daemon has until now been responsible for controlling the animation heuristics when they should be disabled while now Mutter has added support for tracking software rendering situations and in turn GNOME Shell is relying upon that for determining when to disable desktop animations.

  • How not to lose the alpha channel

    Working on color imagery for QiTissue recently, I realized we were accidentally losing the alpha channel in multiple places. For efficiency reasons, we keep colors in memory using the QRgb type, and convert that to/from QString for serialization purposes via QColor as needed. Here’s what I discovered about why that doesn’t work, and some ways I fixed it. Firstly, be aware there is no QRgba in the Qt API . There is only QRgb, for 8bit color channels. It can hold an alpha value too, despite the lack of a trailing a in the type name. Then there is QRgba64 which uses 16bit per color channel. For our purposes, 8bit per channel is sufficient. So where do we lose the alpha channel, when QRgb can store it in principle?

  • Fosdem and Plasma Mobile Sprint

    From January 31st to February 8th I went on a little tour, first at the two days of Fosdem in Brussels, then to Berlin for a KDE sprint about Plasma Mobile. It was the first time i went to Fodem: it’s an awesome experience, even tough big and messy: which is the awesome of it… and the bad of it at the same time Even tough there were 800 talks I didn’t attend that many, some about the Elixir language, some about retrocomputing, some about iot stuff. At Fosdem the best thing to do there.. is meeting a lot of interesting people, rather than attending talks, which are very interesting never the less, which you can find videos here.

  • Norbert Preining: Okular update for Debian

    The quest for a good tabbed pdf viewer lead me okular. While Gnome3 has gone they way of “keep it stupid keep it simple” to appeal to less versed users, KDE has gone the opposite direction and provides lots of bells and knobs to configure their application. Not surprisingly, I am tending more and more to KDE apps away from the redux stuff of Gnome apps.

Android Leftovers

Security, Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (netty and netty-3.9), Fedora (ceph, dovecot, poppler, and webkit2gtk3), openSUSE (inn and rmt-server), Oracle (openjpeg2), Red Hat (rabbitmq-server), Scientific Linux (openjpeg2), SUSE (dnsmasq, rsyslog, and slurm), and Ubuntu (php7.0).

  • 30 The Most Common Hacking Techniques and How to Deal with Them [Ed: Cracking, not hacking. Not the same thing.]
  • A guide to developing a holistic IT security strategy

    In assessing how prevalent cyberattacks are for companies, 18 percent of respondents rated the security risk as very high. Half (50 percent) even stated that their company had suffered financial losses due to security incidents. Opinions differed as to whether the incidents were handled optimally: Almost half (49 percent) say that everything worked well, while the other half (49 percent) believe there is a lot of potential for improvement.

  • Linux and malware: Should you worry? [Ed: All those headlines with question marks mean that the answer is "No."]

    Gone are the days when the idea of viruses or other malware hitting Linux was almost universally greeted with quizzical glances, if not outright rejection. Long thought of as the perfect marriage of open-source goodness and strong, Unix-like security, Linux-based operating systems are now increasingly seen as another valuable – and viable – target. This shift in thinking is partly the result of a growing realization among both Linux hobbyists and system administrators that a compromised Linux system such as a web server provides attackers an excellent ‘return on investment’. Just as importantly, malware research in recent years has brought better visibility into threats facing Linux systems.

Devices: Raspberry Pi, Industrial/Panel PCs and RISC-V

         
  • How to play sound and make noise with your Raspberry Pi
           
             

    If your amazing project is a little too quiet, add high-fidelity sound with Raspberry Pi and the help of this handy guide from HackSpace magazine, written by PJ Evans.

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  • Raspberry Pi 4 UEFI+ACPI Firmware Aims to Make the Board SBBR-Compliant

    As Arm wanted to enter the server market, they realized they had to provide systems that could boot standard operating system images without modifications or hacks – just as they do on x86 server -, so in 2014 the company introduced the Server Base System Architecture Specification (SBSA) so that all a single OS image can run on all ARMv8-A servers.

  • Linux-ready Apollo Lake panel PC has IP65 protection

    WinSystems’ IP65-protected, 12-inch “PPC12-427” capacitive panel PC runs on an Apollo Lake SoC with up to 8GB DDR3L ECC RAM, 2x GbE, 2x 4K DP, 4x USB, and -30 to 85°C support. Grand Prairie, Texas based WinSystems has announced a fanless, 12.1-inch, panel PC designed for signage, kiosk, food service, and industrial IoT HMI applications.

  • Modular Coffee Lake system has SUMIT and optional PCIe expansion

    Ibase’s “MAF800” industrial AI PC runs Ubuntu or Win 10 on an 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPU with 3x GbE, 2x SATA, 6x USB 3.0, and 2x SUMIT slots for an optional 4x PoE module. Other models offer PCIe x16, x8, and x4 slots. Last week, Taiwan-based Ibase announced it was pulling out of next week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg due to concerns about the coronavirus. Other announced no-shows include Arm, Bridgetek, Digi-Key, FTDI, Kontron, and Rohm. Yet, Ibase and others appear to be pushing forward with their usual late February embedded product announcements.

  • Antmicro GEM ASIC Leverages zGlue Technology to Quickly Bring Custom Arm/RISC-V SoC’s to Market

    Introduced in 2018, ZiP (zGlue Integration Platform) chip-stacking technology aims to produce chips similar to Systems-in-Package (SiP) but at much lower costs and lead times.

  • Aldec and Codasip at Embedded World: Showcasing an Integrated UVM Simulation Environment for Verifying Custom Instructions with RISC-V Cores

    “Variability of the RISC-V ISA-based processor family brings new challenges to design flow. In particular, IP and SoC verification needs productivity boost tools and seamless integration into our design environment,” said Karel Masařík, CEO of Codasip. “Our generic UVM methodology combined with Aldec's simulation and code coverage efficiency analysis helps us add the desired RISC-V core extensions and provide core customization faster than our competition.”