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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive: Café, Sprint and More

    And for the pleasure, here is a screenshot of Kdenlive's clip monitor where you can see several of the new features that are currently being worked on for the 16.04 release. The monitor looks a bit cluttered like this but it's just for the demo - everything is configurable.

  • Creating a Qt 5 port to Apple tvOS

    Back in November, Apple released the latest generation of it’s Apple TV product. Besides the slightly improved hardware, the true new feature is the OS which is now officially based on iOS and comes with the dedicated SDK and App Store! So we started investigating what it would take to port Qt to tvOS and start writing some apps for the big screen.

  • App Review of GCompris: Kids' Happiness

    If you have children, you know how hard it is to make a child happy and interested in something for a long time. But there is an easy way to do that: show them GCompris. It is a really great game set for children 2-10 years old and they surely will like it. You may ask, if GCompris is really so good, and I would answer you "Yes". And that is not a joke. Here are some proofs of that. But, you know, nothing is ideal, so I will also mention its bad sides (unfortunately, they are present too).

  • KDE Ships Plasma 5.5.4, bugfix Release for January
  • KDE Plasma 5.5.4 Lands with Notification Improvements for Multi-Monitor Setups

    Today, January 26, 2016, KDE proudly announced that the fourth maintenance release for the Plasma 5 desktop environment is now available for GNU/Linux distribution vendors to compile and push to their default repositories for users to update.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Interacting with the Pootle Bot on Gerrit

    Have you received “A polite ping, still working on this bug?” message on one of your Gerrit submissions? You can simply send an arbitrary reply to avoid the patch being abandoned within a month. Here we discuss more about Pootle bot, which is one of the QA (Quality Assurance) tools for the LibreOffice QA team to manage old submissions.

  • Optimizing your QML application for compilation to C++

    This is the start of a series of posts where I'm going to share some insights on how to adjust a QML application to get the most out of qmlsc, the QML Script Compiler. In contrast to previous posts, I won't talk about the abstract architecture or the high level picture.

  • Compiling QML to C++: Annotating JavaScript functions

    This is the second installment in the series on how to adjust your QML application to take the maximum advantage of qmlsc. In the first post we've set up the environment and taken an initial measurement. I highly recommend reading that one first.

  • PaloAlto init-cfg.txt Bootstrap Config file Layout with Examples

    When you install and configure the PaloAlto firewall, when the firewall boots up for the first time, it does the bootstrapping process. PaloAlto uses the settings defined in the bootstrap files, including the init-cfg.txt and bootstrap.xml under the config folder to configure the initial state of the firewall.

  • $30 compact multi-sensor board works with any microcontroller with I2C (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    SENSE is a compact multi-sensor board supporting measurement of air quality, sound, light intensity, temperature, proximity, etc… and designed by Zack Seifert, a seventeen-year-old electronics enthusiast and president of his school’s robotics team.

  • I will just quickly do a blog post...

    I got ”inspired” by my writing of the previous blog post, and wrote in a channel about my experience some time ago. So why not also do a blog post about doing a blog post :) So… I was planning to use GitLab’s Pages feature via my Hugo fork as usual to push it through. So like, concentrate on writing and do a publish, right, like in good old times? I did so, but all I got both locally and in remote pipeline was stuff like…

  • Rust: A Critical Retrospective

    Since I was unable to travel for a couple of years during the pandemic, I decided to take my new-found time and really lean into Rust. After writing over 100k lines of Rust code, I think I am starting to get a feel for the language and like every cranky engineer I have developed opinions and because this is the Internet I’m going to share them. The reason I learned Rust was to flesh out parts of the Xous OS written by Xobs. Xous is a microkernel message-passing OS written in pure Rust. Its closest relative is probably QNX. Xous is written for lightweight (IoT/embedded scale) security-first platforms like Precursor that support an MMU for hardware-enforced, page-level memory protection. In the past year, we’ve managed to add a lot of features to the OS: networking (TCP/UDP/DNS), middleware graphics abstractions for modals and multi-lingual text, storage (in the form of an encrypted, plausibly deniable database called the PDDB), trusted boot, and a key management library with self-provisioning and sealing properties. One of the reasons why we decided to write our own OS instead of using an existing implementation such as SeL4, Tock, QNX, or Linux, was we wanted to really understand what every line of code was doing in our device. For Linux in particular, its source code base is so huge and so dynamic that even though it is open source, you can’t possibly audit every line in the kernel. Code changes are happening at a pace faster than any individual can audit. Thus, in addition to being home-grown, Xous is also very narrowly scoped to support just our platform, to keep as much unnecessary complexity out of the kernel as possible.

  • Huang: Rust: A Critical Retrospective

    Andrew 'bunnie' Huang has posted an extensive review of the Rust language derived from the experience of writing "over 100k lines" of code.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 443
  • Caolán McNamara: Dark Style Preference with GTK

    Added something to track the org.freedesktop.appearance.color-scheme property as used by the GNOME 42 Dark Style Preference setting. Screencast recorded with the new iteration of GNOME's screen built-in recorder which is quite snazzy.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (microcode_ctl, rubygem-nokogiri, and vim), Mageia (htmldoc, python-django, and python-oslo-utils), Red Hat (container-tools:2.0, kernel, kernel-rt, kpatch-patch, and pcs), SUSE (ardana-barbican, grafana, openstack-barbican, openstack-cinder, openstack-heat-gbp, openstack-horizon-plugin-gbp-ui, openstack-ironic, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron-gbp, python-lxml, release-notes-suse-openstack-cloud, autotrace, curl, firefox, libslirp, php7, poppler, slurm_20_11, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (bind9, gnome-control-center, and libxrandr).

  • Apple Safari, Microsoft Windows 11 & Teams, Hacked During $800,000 0-Day Fest [Ed: Microsoft puts back doors in its things, so security is never the goal, nor is it accomplished]
  • Red Hat Kubernetes security report finds people are the problem

    Kubernetes, despite being widely regarded as an important technology by IT leaders, continues to pose problems for those deploying it. And the problem, apparently, is us. The open source container orchestration software, being used or evaluated by 96 per cent of organizations surveyed [PDF] last year by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, has a reputation for complexity. Witness the sarcasm: "Kubernetes is so easy to use that a company devoted solely to troubleshooting issues with it has raised $67 million," quipped Corey Quinn, chief cloud economist at IT consultancy The Duckbill Group, in a Twitter post on Monday referencing investment in a startup called Komodor. And the consequences of the software's complication can be seen in the difficulties reported by those using it.

  • CISA Releases Analysis of FY21 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments | CISA

    CISA has released an analysis and infographic detailing the findings from the 112 Risk and Vulnerability Assessments (RVAs) conducted across multiple sectors in Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21).

  • ISC Releases Security Advisory for BIND

    The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) has released a security advisory that addresses a vulnerability affecting version 9.18.0 of ISC Berkeley Internet Name Domain (BIND). A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial-of-service condition.

  • CVE-2022-1183: Destroying a TLS session early causes assertion failure

    An assertion failure can be triggered if a TLS connection to a configured http TLS listener with a defined endpoint is destroyed too early.

Videos/Shows: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9, The Linux Link Tech Show, Bad Voltage, and BSD Now

today's howtos

  • GNU Linux (distro independent) – how to set fixed ip (brute force overwrite) – temporarily (also possible for DNS)

    this is a quick bash hack, to set an additional fixed ip to the user’s interface, this will (brute force) OVERWRITE all mess done by network managers of various origins: (there should be only one config file to config network settings and it is: /etc/network/interfaces, instead of 10x entities inventing it’s own standard, confusing the heck out of users, just keep the standard that is already there?)

  • How to Enable More Multi-Touch Gestures in Ubuntu 22.04 GNOME 42 | UbuntuHandbook

    This simple tutorial shows how to enable 3-finger & 4-finger multi-touch gestures in Ubuntu 22.04, Fedora 36 and other Linux with GNOME 40+, while the desktop by default supports only few gestures.

  • How to Install Open Source osTicket on Ubuntu 20.04

    A server can contain many important business applications. These applications can help us to deploy even a support ticket system to better manage the technical service of a company. Today, you will learn how to install osTicket on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Install and Use Bitwarden on Linux

    A password manager is an application that lets you generate new passwords and store existing ones securely. It eliminates the need to create and remember strong and complex passwords yourself for all your accounts. Depending on the device and operating system you're using, you can find all kinds of password managers. Bitwarden is a free-to-use password manager that comes with all the essential password management features. Follow along to learn how to install and set up Bitwarden on Linux.

  • How to install Borgmatic for easy Linux server backups | TechRepublic

    Do you have a reliable backup solution running on your Linux servers? If not, what’s your plan for disaster recovery? The word “disaster” alone should be enough to help you realize backups are an absolutely crucial part of your organization. If you’re in the market for a new Linux backup solution, there’s a lesser-known solution that does an outstanding job, and it’s fairly easy to install and configure. That solution is Borgmatic. This simple, configuration-driven backup solution protects your files (and even databases) with client-side encryption and even offers third-party integration for things like monitoring. I want to walk you through the process of installing Borgmatic on Ubuntu Server 22.04. When complete, you should feel confident your important data is regularly being backed up.

  • How to install the Caddy web server on Ubuntu Server 22.04 | TechRepublic

    Caddy is a powerful open-source web server, written in Go, that can be used to host web applications in a production environment. Caddy features built-in automated TLS certificate renewals, OSCP stapling, static file serving, reverse proxy, Kubernetes ingress and much more. Caddy can be run as a stand-alone web server, an app server or even within containers. In this tutorial, I’m going to walk you through the steps of installing Caddy on Ubuntu Server 22.04 and then how to create a simple, static site.