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Ubuntu's Secure Boot support vulnerability threatens even Windows PCs

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is thwarting Microsoft’s efforts to keep PCs safe. Modern Windows PCs are required to ship with Secure Boot enabled, a safety measure that limits access to Microsoft-approved operating systems. To make life easier for Linux users, Microsoft provides Linux distribution bootloaders with a Microsoft signing key. But Ubuntu’s signed bootloader will happily boot unsigned code, breaking the whole chain of trust. Thankfully, this is set to change with the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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You Should Be In Control of Your Tech

On the hardware front having control means hardware you can open and inspect and is designed for repairability. That hardware should ideally run firmware (as much as possible) that is free software so you can also inspect and update it. If the hardware provides security features, they should be designed to put you in control, not the vendor, including control of any keys. The hardware should not require the vendor’s signatures (and therefore their permission) to boot an operating system, but instead should let you boot into whatever operating system you prefer. The operating system and the software it runs, should all be free software. Free software by its very nature puts you in full control. You have control because you can not only inspect the software to see what it does, you (or someone else in the community with software development knowledge) can change the software if it operates outside your interests. You may have noticed that you don’t tend to have a lot of adware or spyware in the free software world. That’s because it’s difficult to hide spyware inside of code that anyone can inspect. Another reason is that if free software behaves in a way that runs counter to the user’s wishes (such as capturing and selling their data, or popping up unwanted ads), the user (or someone else in the community) could simply create a legitimate fork of the project with those objectionable bits removed. Read more

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Anbernic RG552 review

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Wine 7.1

  • WineHQ - Wine Announcement - The Wine development release 7.1 is now available.
    The Wine development release 7.1 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Vulkan 1.3 support.
      - A number of theming fixes.
      - WebSocket improvements.
      - Improved cursor clipping on macOS.
      - IDL compiler fixes for C++.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.1.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.1.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 7.1 is out with Vulkan 1.3 support | GamingOnLinux

    Now that the dust has settled on the bottle of Wine 7.0, the biweekly development releases have begun and Wine 7.1 is out with new features and bug fixes. This is the compatibility layer that allows you to run games and applications developed for Windows - on Linux. Part of what makes up Steam Play Proton. Once a year or so, a new stable release is made.

  • Wine 7.1 Released With Vulkan 1.3 Support, Theming Fixes - Phoronix

    With Wine 7.0 having been released, the code freeze is over and we are now onto the Wine 7.x bi-weekly development releases that will then culminate with the Wine 8.0 stable release one year from now. In kicking off the new development series, Wine 7.1 is out today. Wine 7.1 brings support for Vulkan 1.3 that released earlier this week. The headers and other bits for Wine's Vulkan integration have been updated against the v1.3 specification.