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SourceForge and Slashdot Have Been Sold

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Slashdot Media, which owns the popular websites SourceForge and Slashdot, has been sold to SourceForge Media, LLC, a subsidiary of web publisher BIZX, LLC. Financial terms of the sale were not revealed in the press release announcing the sale, which was published today on the website EIN News.

This afternoon I exchanged a few emails with Logan Abbott who is one of the owners of BIZX and the president of the SourceForge Media subsidiary which he said “was formed for the purposes of this transaction.”

Read more

Also: Slashdot and SourceForge Sold, Now Under New Management

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

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  • Hackers Stole My Website…And I Pulled Off A $30,000 Sting Operation To Get It Back

    I learned that my site was stolen on a Saturday. Three days later I had it back, but only after the involvement of fifty or so employees of six different companies, middle-of-the-night conferences with lawyers, FBI intervention, and what amounted to a sting operation that probably should have starred Sandra Bullock instead of…well…me.

  • Google Summer of Code
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  • Takeaways from Bruce Schneier’s talk: “Security and Privacy in a Hyper-connected World”
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  • [Older] Make America Secure Again: Trump Should Order U.S. Spy Agencies to Responsibly Disclose Cyber Vulnerabilities
    Last week, WikiLeaks released a trove of CIA documents that detail many of the spy agency’s hacking capabilities. These documents, if genuine (and early reports suggest that they are), validate concerns that U.S. spy agencies are stockpiling cybersecurity vulnerabilities. The intelligence community uses undisclosed vulnerabilities to develop tools that can penetrate the computer systems and networks of its foreign targets. Unfortunately, since everyone uses the same technology in today’s global economy, each of these vulnerabilities also represents a threat to American businesses and individuals. In the future, rather than hoard this information, the CIA and other intelligence agencies should commit to responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities it discovers to the private sector so that security holes can be patched.
  • Announcing Keyholder: Secure, shared shell access
    The new software is a ssh-agent proxy that allows a group of trusted users to share an SSH identity without exposing the contents of that identity’s private key. [...] A common use of the ssh-agent is to “forward” your agent to a remote machine (using the -A flag in the OpenSSH client). After you’ve forwarded your ssh-agent, you can use the socket that that agent creates to access any of your many (now unencrypted) keys, and login to any other machines for which you may have keys in your ssh-agent. So, too, potentially, can all the other folks that have root access to the machine to which you’ve forwarded your ssh-agent.
  • pitchfork
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Slackware Current

  • For your Slackware-current: KDE 5_17.03 with lots of goodies
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  • Last week’s package harvest and more

22 things Amarok does: the good, the bad, the ugly, and the hope

Ask not what you can do for Amarok. Ask what Amarok can do for you! Many years ago, just the mention of this music player would invoke shivers down my spine. It was stylish, exotic, modern, elegant, powerful. It did everything superbly, and there was always a hidden Joker up its sleeve. The plethora of options and possibilities and feature was endless. And then it all changed. Amarok slid out of the spotlight and became just another program to play your music collection. Recently, fueled by nostalgia and perhaps vain hope, I’ve invested fresh new energy and time working with it, taming it, fighting it, loving it, hating it, trying to figure out how relevant, sleek and accessibility this player still is. My curiosity peaked with the extensive Plasma testing I did last month in my somewhat ultra-long article The State of Plasma. So I fired KDE neon once again, a brand new image, and started fiddling. Here’s the Spaghetti Western of what to expect. With a big disclaimer. Read on. Read more Also: Reading old stuff

A Short MATE Desktop 1.18 Review in March 2017

MATE 1.18 has been released at 13 March 2017. The source code are available on their public file server and the runnable version has been available on Ubuntu MATE 17.04 "Zesty Zapus". This short review covers some new things for end-users: better playback notifications, "safely remove disk" notification, touchpad/mouse control improvements (libinput), MATE Calc returns, and some more. It's RAM usage on Zesty at idle is ~700MB. This is a continuation from our previous MATE 1.17 review. I hope this review will be helpful for you all. Enjoy! Read more