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Tor and Debian

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Security
Debian
  • Tor Browser 5.5 Gets an Official Release, Includes Tor 0.2.7.8

    The Tor Project has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first stable Tor Browser 5.5 web browser for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • Tor Announces Official Release of Tor Browser 5.5 With New Features

    Tor Browser 5.5 is the first stable release in the 5.5 series of Tor. It is released for all the supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It is now available for download from the Tor Browser Project page along with many new features.

  • The ultra-secure Tails OS beloved by Edward Snowden gets a major upgrade

    Edward Snowden's favorite secure operating system just got a major upgrade. Version 2.0 of the Amnesic Incognito Live System, better known as Tails, rolled out recently. Tails 2.0 brings a new desktop environment, sandboxing for services via the always controversial systemd, and a new build of the Tor Browser.

  • Becoming a Debian contributor

    Over the past two months or so I have become a contributor to the Debian Project. This is something that I’ve wanted to do for a while. Firstly, just because I’ve got so much out of Debian over the last five or six years—both as a day-to-day operating system and a place to learn about computing—and I wanted to contribute something back. And secondly, in following the work of Joey Hess for the past three or four years I’ve come to share various technical and social values with Debian. Of course, I’ve long valued the project of making it possible for people to run their computers entirely on Free Software, but more recently I’ve come to appreciate how Debian’s mature technical and social infrastructure makes it possible for a large number of people to work together to produce and maintain high quality packages. The end result is that the work of making a powerful software package work well with other packages on a Debian system is carried out by one person or a small team, and then as many users who want to make use of that software need only apt-get it. It’s hard to get the systems and processes to make this possible right, especially without a team being paid full-time to set it all up. Debian has managed it on the backs of volunteers. That’s something I want to be a part of.

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Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more