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today's leftovers

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  • Free Pathways to Running Linux Right

    If you're new or relatively new to Linux, you may be looking around for good educational resources and perhaps some tutorials. Whether you're new to Linux or looking to become a more advanced user, there are a lot of free online books and tutorials that can give you guidance. In this post, you'll find our newly updated collection of many good Linux reference guides and tools online--all available at no cost.

  • Build a better web server – Part 1

    Up your computing power with an upgraded or brand new server that you can build yourself

    While big business and big data may be utilising mainframes more of late, the concept of servers is not going away any time soon. Servers are an integral part of any system, however large your IT infrastructure is. Whether it’s inside the data centre or tucked away in your (well-ventilated!) cupboard at home, there are still a lot of uses for servers in 2015.

    For the office you may want to save a bit of money and create something perfect for your needs that you know exactly how to maintain. For home you may just want to enhance your setup and make the entire network more efficient. For both it’s a great way to separate certain aspects of your network to control it in a more efficient way.

    There are many components of a server that you need to keep in mind, but it boils down to an appropriate hardware selection and a good distro for the task at hand. In this tutorial, we are going to concentrate on file and web servers, two base server systems that can be expanded and modified in multiple ways to best fit the situation you are in.

    As we’re teaching you how to build a better web server, we will first take a quick detour to tell you what you should know if you want to upgrade your current server so that it can compete with the new tech.

  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 02

    In this episode: Good news from Qt and bad news for 32 bit Google Chrome users. The Linux Foundation ditches individual membership and Microsoft MITs more code. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons, Voices, Competition Prizes and An Important Announcement.

  • How many IoT devices do you own?

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly changing the way we interact with the world around us. A whole host of devices are becoming smarter, more connected, and better able to anticipate our needs. Whether in the form of wearables, home automation, connected cars, or business asset tracking, every day we are seeing a greater level of engagement between the physical world and the digital.

    While this enormous growth in IoT may seem inevitable, like any emerging technology, there are issues which have not yet fully sorted themselves out yet. How can we be sure that all of the devices we own can speak to one another in a language which they all understand, regardless of who manufactured them? How can we be sure we always have access to our data even if we end our relationship with the product's vendor? And how can we know that our data, which by its nature is often quite personal, is always safe and secure?

  • App: Audio Trimmer for Samsung Z3 in the Tizen Store

    Audio Trimmer, an app for the Samsung Z3, is an entertainment app which allows you to trim your songs down to your favorite parts, just like the name suggests.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Ubuntu: Ubuntu 18.04 Install and First Look, Canonical and Trilio Deal, Ubuntu Server Development and Shuttleworth's Controversy

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Install and First Look
    The long anticipated Ubuntu 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” Long Term Support (LTS) release has arrived… Let’s install it and take a look around.
  • Canonical Managed Cloud adds data protection and recovery with Trilio
    Canonical and Trilio announced today a partnership agreement to deliver TrilioVault backup and recovery solutions as part of BootStack, Canonical’s fully managed OpenStack private cloud solution. TrilioVault will also be made available as an option to Ubuntu Advantage support customers. As a result, users already taking advantage of the Ubuntu platform for their OpenStack deployment now have seamless access to the only OpenStack-native data protection solution on the market. Together, the two companies are pushing the boundaries of enterprise OpenStack clouds to become increasingly easier to build, simpler to manage, and more reliable in the event of a disaster.
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 22 May 2018
  • Ubuntu's Shuttleworth Creates Controversy with OpenStack Summit Vancouver Keynote
    The OpenStack Foundation is facing a bit of drama and controversy as it deals with issues related to a keynote delivered by Ubuntu Linux founder, Mark Shuttleworth at the OpenStack Summit here on May 21. Typically the OpenStack Foundation posts videos of all its session online within 24 hours, but with the Shuttleworth keynote, the video was apparently posted and then promptly removed. During his keynote, Shuttleworth took direct aim at his OpenStack competitor Red Hat, which apparently made some people in the OpenStack Summit community uncomfortable.

Offline Computing – 10 Apps for the Digital Nomad

In today’s always-connected, constantly-inturrupted world, it can often be rewarding to go offline. Disconnecting from the Internet doesn’t mean you have to buy a yurt, live on beans, and get no work done though! While there’s a ton of great apps in the Snap store which rely on a connection to function, there’s also a lot you can do offline. So whether you’re taking a trip that doesn’t offer (reasonably priced) in-flight wifi, or want to live life the digital nomad style, we’ve got some apps for you! These all work offline, so once installed you can work, study & play without a connection. Read more Also: Linux Release Roundup: GNOME Twitch, Shotwell & GIMP

Finally: Historic Eudora email code goes open source

The source code to the Eudora email client is being released by the Computer History Museum, after five years of discussion with the IP owner, Qualcomm. The Mac software was well loved by early internet adopters and power users, with versions appearing for Palm, Newton and Windows. At one time, the brand was so synonymous with email that Lycos used Eudora to brand its own webmail service. As the Mountain View, California museum has noted, "It’s hard to overstate Eudora’s popularity in the mid-1990s." Read more Also: The Computer History Museum Just Made Eudora Open Source