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Leftovers: Debian (FOSDEM, Debian Activities, Dedication to Ian Murdock)

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Debian
  • Back from FOSDEM

    FOSDEM continues to be huge. There are just so many people, and it overflows everywhere into ULB—even the hallways during the talks are packed! I don't have a good solution for this, but I wish I did. Perhaps some rooms could be used as “overflow rooms”, ie., do a video link/stream to them, so that more people can get to watch the talks in the most popular rooms.

  • My Debian Activities in January 2016

    This month I marked 281 package for accept and rejected 58, so almost back to normal processing. I also sent 19 emails to maintainers asking questions.

  • Free software activities in January 2016

    My work in the Reproducible Builds project was also covered in more depth in Lunar's weekly reports (#35, #36, #37, #38, #39)

  • Linux Lite 2.8 Officially Released, Dedicated to the Memory of Ian Murdock

    Jerry Bezencon was extremely proud to announce today, February 1, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of his Ubuntu-based Linux Lite 2.8 computer operating system.

    Linux Lite 2.8 is the last point release in the 2.0 series of the distribution, and it has been dedicated to the memory of Ian Murdock, the creator of the well-known Debian Project and the Debian GNU/Linux operating system, who sadly passed away on December 28, 2015. Linux Lite 2.8 is mostly a maintenance build that aims to keep the OS stable and reliable for its dedicated users.

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