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  • Kubernetes in 5 minutes

    Explain Kubernetes in just five minutes? Impossible, thought Jamie Duncan. But he did it anyway.

  • GPIO Zero and Raspberry Pi programming starter projects
  • Uzair Shamim: Writing A Hangman Game (Python)
  • Programmer Makes Self-driving Toy Car Powered By Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Python

    On his blog, Zheng explains that the complete system consists of three parts: the input unit, processing unit and the RC car control unit.

    The input unit consists of a Raspberry Pi Model B+ attached with a camera and an HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensor. This unit collects the data (color video and sensor data) that is sent to a computer over local WiFi with the help two client programs running on Pi.

    The processing unit receives the video data from Raspberry Pi and it’s converted to gray scale and decoded into numpy arrays. Zheng further explains the other jobs performed in the processing unit — “OpenCV Python neural network training and prediction (steering), object detection (stop sign and traffic light), distance measurement (monocular vision), and sending instructions to Arduino through USB connection.”

More in Tux Machines

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software