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Android Marshmallow: The smart person's guide

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Android

Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) makes massive strides in polishing the dull sheen left behind by Android 5.0 (Lollipop). In fact, Marshmallow is the best incarnation of Android yet.

Here's a look at what Marshmallow has to offer. We'll update this guide as new information about Marshmallow becomes available.

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