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Upgrading Bios Firmware from Linux Systems Pioneered by Dell

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Linux

The ability to upgrade the firmware on a system from a Linux OS is something that Dell and Red Hat are going to implement, and the first steps have been taken already.

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More in Tux Machines

YouTube Downloader and Firefox in EasyOS

  • YouTube downloader fixes

    The YouTube downloader GUI is a frontend for /usr/bin/youtube-dl, which is a python script. A problem is that YouTube move the goal posts, in an attempt to stop these downloaders from working. The youtube-dl developers respond by changing their script so that it works again.

  • Firefox version 94.0.2

    Have just downloaded English, French and German Firefox 94.0.2 tarballs, and it will be in the next release of EasyOS.

Use BespokeSynth on Fedora Linux

Sun Aug 14 10:36:37 2016, this is the birth date of BespokeSynth. Since that date, BespokeSynth has grown a lot; both in terms of its user base and the size of its codebase. BespokeSynth is an application for performing modular synthesis. Because it has been written by a newcomer to modular synthesis, it is quite different from the usual modular synthesizer. Note: I am the manager of the LinuxMAO / Audinux Copr repository. Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Writing and unit testing a Python application to query the RPM database | Enable Sysadmin

    When installing software on a Linux system, your package manager keeps track of what's installed, what it's dependent upon, what it provides, and much more. The usual way to look at that metadata is through your package manager. In the case of Fedora or Red Hat Enterprise Linux, it is the RPM database. The RPM database can be queried from the command line with the rpm command, which supports some very nice formatting options. For example, to get a list of all packages sorted by size, I can use a little bit of Bash glue to do the following:

  • How DevSecOps brings security into the development process

    DevSecOps is an extension of DevOps that emphasizes security automation and cooperation across the organization. More than just hype, DevSecOps is a crucial addition to your organization's development and deployment processes, especially given the range of ransomware groups, industrial spies, identity thieves, and other attackers plaguing today's cyberworld. In this article, you will learn how DevSecOps extends familiar DevOps tools and processes to help cross-functional teams work together on the design and implementation of security policies and procedures.

  • Kubernetes and OpenShift: The best of 2021

    2021 was a big year in the world of Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift, and over the past twelve months, we have aimed to provide content that will satisfy developer curiosity on how to best use these platforms, from info on the big release of OpenShift 4.8 to tutorials on deploying Helm charts and working with OpenShift Serverless Functions. Keep reading for these highlights and more.

  • Quarkus, containers, and Java: Tune in to Jconf.dev 2021

    The Jconf.dev community Java conference is going virtual for 2021, which means that developers worldwide will be able to stream sessions of interest wherever they are. The conference is on December 9, and a number of Red Hatters are presenting material that will be of interest to the developer community. Read on to learn more and find out when to tune in.

  • Our top 5 Harvard Business Review articles of 2021

    Each month, through our partnership with Harvard Business Review, we share five new HBR articles we believe CIOs and IT leaders will value highly. As 2021 comes to a close, we are taking a look back at the five most popular HBR articles from this past year. Here are the stories that resonated with you.

Julia 1.7 Released

  • Julia 1.7 Highlights

    Jeff Bezanson, Jameson Nash, Ian Butterworth, Kristoffer Carlsson, Shuhei Kadowaki, Elliot Saba, Viral B Shah, Mosè Giordano, Simeon Schaub, Nicholas Bauer, Keno Fischer After 4 betas and 3 release candidates, Julia version 1.7 has finally been released. We would like to thank all the contributors to this release (more than 79 people) and all the testers that helped with finding regressions and issues in the pre-releases. Without you, this release would not have been possible. The full list of changes can be found in the NEWS file, but here we'll give a more in-depth overview of some of the release highlights.

  • Julia 1.7 Released With Improved Threading Capabilities - Phoronix

    Version 1.7 of the Julia programming language implementation is now available, the open-source high-performance language that is general purpose but especially popular for computational science and numerical analysis. The Julia programming language is increasingly used for numerical computing/analysis use-cases and by all accounts remains on a terrific upward trajectory. Julia 1.7 is the latest feature release adding on new features and functionality.