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The Influence of Debian in Linux Open Source Community

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Debian

The Linux community, and the technology world in general, were shocked by the news of Ian’s Murdock tragic death a couple of weeks ago – and rightfully so. Ian’s legacy and vision as the founder of the Debian project not only influenced many others who went on to start their own distributions, but also were the means to create a rock-solid operating system that many individuals and businesses of all sizes have used for more than 20 years.

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EOL:

  • Debian 6 LTS reaches end-of-life on February 29 - it's time to upgrade

    The Debian Long Term Support team has announced that Debian 6 - a long term support release - will stop receiving updates on February 29, 2016. Debian 6 was first released on February 6, 2011, and saw ten point releases while it was supported by the main nucleus of the Debian community. Since July 19, 2014, maintenance of Debian 6 has been left to the Long Term Support team.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 LTS "Squeeze" to Reach End-of-Life on February 29, 2016

    Today, February 12, 2016, the Debian Project has announced that the long-term supported Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 (Squeeze) is about to reach end-of-life (EOL) in approximately two weeks, on February 29, 2016.

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With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more