Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

FOSS in Education

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source is now ready to compete with Mathematica for use in the classroom

    When I think about what makes SageMath different, one of the most fundamental things is that it was created by people who use it every day. It was created by people doing research math, by people teaching math at universities, and by computer programmers and engineers using it for research. It was created by people who really understand computational problems because we live them. We understand the needs of math research, teaching courses, and managing an open source project that users can contribute to and customize to work for their own unique needs.

  • The scarcity of college graduates with FOSS experience

    In the education track at SCALE 14x in Pasadena, Gina Likins spoke about the surprisingly difficult task of getting information about open-source development practices into undergraduate college classrooms. That scarcity makes it hard to find new college graduates who have experience with open source. Although the conventional wisdom is that open source "is everywhere," the college computer-science (CS) or software-engineering (SE) classroom has proven to be a tough nut to crack—and may remain so for quite some time.

    Likins works on Red Hat's University Outreach team—a group that does not do recruiting, she emphasized. Rather, the team travels to campuses around the United States and engages with teachers, administrators, and students about open source in the classroom. The surprise is how little open source one finds, at least in CS and SE degrees. Employers expect graduates to be familiar with open-source projects and tools (e.g., using Git, bug trackers, and so forth), she said, and incoming students report expecting to find it in the curriculum, but it remains a rarity.

  • A Selection of Talks from FOSDEM 2016

    It's that time of the year where I go to FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers' European Meeting). The keynotes and the maintracks are very good, with good presentations and contents.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 3.18.50

I'm announcing the release of the 3.18.50 kernel. All users of the 3.18 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 3.18.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-3.18.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more

openSUSE Leap's backward version jump

Hi all, On behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Management I am pleased to announce the next version of openSUSE Leap after 42.3 will be: openSUSE Leap 15 As with Leap 42.x, minor releases are expected annually for at least 3 years, so you can expect a Leap 15.1 to follow, then 15.2 and onwards. Obviously this is quite a dramatic change from the current version number of 42.x, so I will explain what justifies this change in some detail below. Read more

Switch to open source model turns costs into R&D

Public administrations that switch to an open source software model and contracting for services, also transform the costs previously spent on acquisition and maintenance into budget for research, development and innovation, says Álvaro Anguix, general manager of the gvSIG association. Read more

German states adopt open source-based security checks system

The German federal state of Thuringia will join North RhineWestphalia, Baden-Württemberg, Hamburg and Hesse and start using OSiP, a system for performing security checks for staff access to sensitive areas. The system, built on open source components, is set to become the default security system for all 16 federal states. Read more