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Mandriva 2007 Beta 1 released.

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OS

The information below part of the Mandriva 2007 Beta 1 release README file:

Release notes for the first Mandriva Linux 2007 first beta version

Mandriva Linux 2007 Thor is the first beta version for the Mandriva Linux
2007 Edition.

You can see the technical details at
http://qa.mandriva.com/twiki/bin/view/Main/DistroChangelog.

- Availability

This Beta is mainly available via two means. First via the public FTP and HTTP
sites mirroring the Mandriva Linux repository. Check the current development
mirrors at CookerMirrors, the 2007 Beta tree is in /devel/2007.0/. Second,
the preferred way, via either the provided One CDs (installable live CDs), or
the intallation DVD or the six installation CDs. You will find the live CDs
and the installation CDs and DVD in the same mirrors as the cooker one, in
the /devel/iso/2007.0/ section.

- Known Issues

* The software installer (rpmdrake) is broken, you must use urpmi and
the command line to install new packages;
* A lot of menu entries are not yet displayed because the XDG migration
is not finished.

- Main changes

* New Mirror structure
* New network popup notifications
* Gnome 2.16 beta 1
* Kernel 2.6.17
* KDE 3.5.3
* Updated wireless application (drakroam)
* Switch to XDG menus (in progress)

- Mandriva Linux 2007 Beta One CDs

This Beta version comes in 5 differents live installable CDs, which includes
each one different languages support. For space constraints, the language are
only present on one of the 5 CDs. Likely the language repartition will change for
the future betas. You will find which languages is included in each version in
the following description. However, once the live CD is installed, you have the
possibility to add new languages if you configure an external Mandriva Linux
2007 urpmi source.

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