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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • ONF Offers OpenDaylight Support in Latest Atrium SDN Stack

    The embrace of the OpenDaylight SDN controller follows the support of the ONOS controller in the first release of the Atrium software last year.
    Open Networking Foundation officials are hoping to accelerate the adoption of network virtualization by including support for the OpenDaylight SDN controller in the latest release of its open-source Atrium software distribution.

  • Wikimedia: We’re Building Something, But It’s Not A Search Engine To Challenge Google

    The Wikimedia Foundation has rejected the media reports that claimed that the non-profit is working on some search engine that will be a one-click replacement of Google.

  • ReactOS 0.4.0 Released
  • Open source Windows-clone ReactOS hits version 0.4 (ten years after 0.3)

    The developers of ReactOS have been working to develop an open source operating system capable of running Windows software since 1998.

    It’s been slow going: version 0.3.0 was released in 2006. Nearly 10 years later, ReactOS 0.4.0 is available for download.

  • Skytap Supports the Modern Developer Toolchain with Vagrant, Open Source Contributions
  • Here's why Bottle Rocket is contributing open-source code

    Bottle Rocket has stepped out from behind its proprietary code and expanded its reach into the open-source market.

    The Addison-based company, which creates custom mobile applications for business customers, has released its first few pieces of code for Android and plans to build on the code it has shared with the development community.

  • Securing Hadoop: Technical Recommendations

    Before we wrap up this series on securing Hadoop databases, I am happy to announce that Vormetric has asked to license this content, and Hortonworks is also evaluating a license as well. It’s community support that allows us to bring you this research free of charge. Also, I’ve received a couple email and twitter responses to the content; if you have more input to offer, now is the time to send it along to be evaluated with the rest of the feedback as we will assembled the final paper in the coming week. And with that, onto the recommendations.

  • 2016 Open Source Awards Finalists Named

    The Benjamin Franklin Award is a humanitarian/bioethics award presented annually by Bioinformatis.org to an individual who has, in his or her practice, promoted free and open access to the materials and methods used in the life sciences.

  • Geography students bring open-source mapping group to State College

    Two geography students have started a Maptime chapter in State College to support community cartography and teach people how to use and create maps. The endeavor is co-sponsored by The Peter R. Gould Center for Geography Education and Outreach in Penn State’s Department of Geography.

    “I really want to put State College on the map—literally,” geography graduate student Carolyn Fish said. “So much open-source mapping is centered in large cities, such as New York, Washington and San Francisco.”

  • Sci-Hub: This Scientist Is Running A “Pirate Bay” For Researchers With 48 Million Free Documents

    Sci-Hub describes itself as the first pirate website in the world that provides public access to millions of research paper to the masses.

  • Open Source CowTech Ciclop 3D Scanner Kit Available on Kickstarter for $99

    Montana-based startup CowTech launched an affordable 3D scanner kit on Kickstarter and they easily breezed past their funding goal in the first 24 hours. The CowTech Ciclop is a $99 3D laser scanner kit that was designed specifically with owners of 3D printers in mind. The buyer can print most of the scanner parts out on their own 3D printer and the parts were designed to fit on virtually any desktop 3D printer with a print bed volume of 115 x 110 x 65 mm (4.5 x 4.3 x 2.6 in) or higher. Once all of the components have been printed, the assembly process is quick and simple, and the Ciclop can start scanning in less than 30 minutes.

  • Security advisories for Wednesday

More in Tux Machines

Review: UBports on the PinePhone

At the end of 2021 I posted a review about the PinePhone and what it was like running the device's default operating system: Manjaro Linux featuring the Plasma Mobile interface. While I've had decent experiences with Plasma Mobile in the past, the combination of Manjaro, the PinePhone, and this interface left a lot to be desired. It was slow, it was unstable, and there were issues with the battery charge indicator. To make matters worse, the default applications were not polished or well named. It was a rough experience and, though I can see where there is hope for Manjaro on the PinePhone, I was eager to try something different. In the past I have had mostly good experiences with the UBports distribution. UBports is a community project which has continued Canonical's Ubuntu Touch operating system for smart phones and tablets. Since I've run UBports on devices which didn't have any more memory or processing power than the PinePhone, I was optimistic about trying out the PinePhone with this alternative distribution. Read more

Switching from OpenNTPd to Chrony

A friend recently reminded me of the existence of chrony, a "versatile implementation of the Network Time Protocol (NTP)". Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Enable MySQL/MariaDB Query Logging

    In this short and easy to follow guide, we cover how to enable MySQL/MariaDB query logging and save queries to a file. When using a database, it often happens that developers want to know what’s going on behind the scene. Whether it is for troubleshooting, performance tuning, or out of sheer curiosity. General query logs remain one of the most popular sources of auditing and diagnostic information in MySQL/MariaDB databases. After logging is enabled, the database server will write information to the log file when clients connect or disconnect, and it will log each SQL statement.

  • How to install Zotero on Ubuntu 22.04 or 20.04 LTS - Linux Shout

    Zotero is a reference management system and academic network, here we learn the steps to install Zotero in Linux such as Ubuntu 22.04 Jammy JellyFish or Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa. Zotero is an open-source and free tool that helps in collecting, organizing, citing, and sharing research. It consists of two components: Zotero standalone (Mac, Windows, Linux) with a plugin for Firefox, Google Chrome, and Safari; Zotero web application: computer-independent access to your library, finding and setting up groups on specific topics (see collaboration), making contacts with others. The two components of this tool can be synchronized with each other. If you are often involved in extensive projects at work or have to write a large-scale work during your studies, you quickly lose track of the sources used. With Zotero, you keep all information together and create a clear library for your project without much effort. It is particularly suitable for literature research on the Internet and the direct transfer of the researched data and works in groups that want to manage literature together.

  • How to Copy Directory in Linux: (Beginner to Advance)

    While working in several operating systems, we use to add files and folders, cut, copy, edit and delete them as per our choice. Just like all these, the Linux system provides us the opportunity to copy a single folder to another folder even though the folder is empty or not. Therefore, we will discuss some easy methods to copy one directory to another in Ubuntu 20.04 system. Let’s have a fresh start by using the different ways to copy a directory from one place to another in Linux. For this particular purpose, we must open up the terminal shell as we are going to do all things in it. There are two ways to open it. One is from the activity search area and the other is the shortcut key “Ctrl+Alt+T”. Practice one of the mentioned methods to open it and start implementing the commands in it one by one.

  • How to Change Default Torrent Client for Magnet Links in Ubuntu 20.04+ | UbuntuHandbook

    When clicking a magnet link in Chrome browser, it pops-up with “Open xdg-open” option allows to launch the default app to start the downloading. Unlike Firefox, Google Chrome does not offer an option to choose which app to handle the link. Instead, it launches the default app directly. For those want to change this default app to handle magnet links, here’s how to do the trick in Ubuntu.

  • How to install Microsoft Fonts on Elementary OS 6.0 - Invidious
  • How to install VCV Rack 2 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install VCV Rack 2 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Papirus Icon Theme on Ubuntu - OMG! Ubuntu!

    Changing the icon theme on Ubuntu is an easy way to give your desktop a new look and feel. In this post we show you how to install Papirus icons on Ubuntu from a PPA. Why use the Papirus icon set? Because it’s good — in fact, it’s one of the best icon themes for Ubuntu not to mention other Linux distros like Linux Mint, Zorin OS, and Manjaro. Thousands of users use this set, and several Linux distributions ship it as their default.

  • Exploring GIT Commit Hashes & Generating Cryptographic Zeros – Jon's FOSS Blog

    So I was trying to research what goes into generating a GIT commit hash and I thought I would try to personalize the cryptographic hash output a little bit. My computer isn’t that powerful but it may be possible to generate more zeros!

Keyboards and Open-Source - Ignorance is bliss..

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In my Keyboard Fun post from last year I talked a bit about my interest in mechanical keyboards. Since then, I played around with a few more keyboards/switches/keycaps/… Interesting enough, beside the actual hardware, naturally there is some software component to all these keyboards, too. Whereas most commercial keyboards still come with proprietary firmware, there is the trend within the keyboard enthusiast scene to go for open-source firmware. This allows you to properly update the firmware even from your Linux machine and do proper configuration of e.g. the keymap, too. Read more