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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Nightingale music player

    Addons are the most interesting part which makes this music player much more awesome

    there are good number of addons you can install it from their official website

  • LilyPond scores beautiful music

    LilyPond is a free, mature music-typesetting program, similar in flavor to LaTeX. The software is part of the GNU Project and is released under the GNU General Public License (GPL). The authors originally developed LilyPond because they felt that computer-generated scores were, to their eyes, "soulless." They designed LilyPond to follow the traditions laid down in older engraved scores. The desire for "beautiful" music is what drives the community of people who still work on LilyPond, even after more than a decade.

    Version 2.19.36 was released at the end of January, but 2.18 is still considered the stable version. Downloading and installing LilyPond is super easy.

  • Opera 37 Web Browser Now in Development, Users Should Expect a Few Surprises

    Opera Software, through Błażej Kaźmierczak, has announced the promotion of the Opera 37.0 web browser to the Developer channel for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • KDE Neon and the value of communication

    Last week I wrote a little article about something that I felt was a truly terrible idea – the KDE project's announcement of their own Linux Distro… dubbed "KDE Neon."

    The reaction, by portions of the KDE community, to that article would be best described as "a bit intense." People were angry with me for writing something that was so negative towards a KDE project. People were angry with the KDE community for allowing such a project to exist. People were… angry.

  • GNOME Calendar 3.19.90 was released

    This was a very productive cycle for GNOME Calendar, and this release is the result of a hardworked cycle. First of all, the bad news: no DnD support, no Week View, no, no, no!

    But why, Mr. Feaneron?

    The reason is simple. Sanity.

  • Build Configurations and Xdg-App

    It’s no secret that one of the main features I wanted to land this cycle was introductory support for Xdg-App. There really was quite a bit to do to make that happen, including all sorts of seemingly unrelated plumbing.

  • LibreOffice 5.1 Offers Reorganized User Interface for Its Apps

    The Document Foundation (TDF) released LibreOffice 5.1 on Feb. 10, providing users with a new milestone update of the popular open-source office suite. LibreOffice originated as a fork of the open-source OpenOffice suite in 2011 and has been downloaded more than 120 million times since then. LibreOffice includes Writer document, Calc spreadsheet, Impress presentation, Base database and Draw drawing programs as part of the integrated suite. In the LibreOffice 5.1 update, a key area of improvement is the user interface throughout the suite's programs, which all benefit from a reorganization as well as menu additions. With the 5.1 update, the office suite's integrated programs can now load and save files from remote locations directly through menu dialog box. LibreOffice is the default standard office suite in many mainstream Linux distributions, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux, SUSE and Ubuntu. LibreOffice is also available for both Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the new LibreOffice 5.1 release.

  • LibreOffice Is Getting Better GTK3 Support

    Last year LibreOffice made much progress in receiving GTK3 support that it also began running on Wayland. The battle though is not over and more GTK3 improvements are still forthcoming.

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