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6 Excellent Lightweight Linuxes for x86 and ARM

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Linux

Presenting a nice assortment of lightweight yet fully functional Linux distros for all occasions. All of these are full distros that do not depend on cloud services; four for x86 and two, count 'em, two for ARM hardware. (Updated Feb 2016.)

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