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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Hackers use Microsoft security tool to pwn Microsoft security tool

    FireEye security wonks Abdulellah Alsaheel and Raghav Pande have twisted the barrels of Microsoft's lauded EMET Windows defence gun 180 degrees and fired.

    The result of their research is p0wnage of the enhanced mitigation toolkit so that instead of defending Windows it attacks it.

    The attacks the pair found affect older versions of Windows which rely on EMET for modern defences like address space layout randomisation and data execution prevention.

  • Is Linux Really as Secure as You Think It Is?

    Security is an important topic on everyone’s minds in today’s highly-technological world. With all of the security news that pops up on almost a daily basis, trying to be aware of the choices you make can make a big difference. Linux is often touted as the most secure operating system you can get your hands onto, but is this reputation deserved?

  • A Fedora Distribution download primer

    With the fresh news of a compromise in the Linux Mint distribution images, I thought I would take a few minutes to explain how Fedora handles image downloads and what you can do as an end user to make sure you have the correct and official Fedora images.

  • Mousejack: Hacking Computers Via Your Mouse With 15 Lines Of Code And Radio Dongle
  • How Criminals Could Hijack Wireless Mice to Hack Computers from Afar

    Wireless computer mice give users the convenience of not having to deal with cumbersome wires and cables. But they might also open up the door for malicious hackers to get a way into their computers, researchers warn.

    A flaw in the way several popular models of wireless mice and their corresponding receivers, the sticks or “dongles” that plug into a USB port and transmit data between the mouse and the computer, handle encryption could leave “billions” of computers vulnerable to hackers, security firm Bastille warned on Tuesday.

  • Child tracking firm calls out security researcher on 'hack'

    A CHILD MONITORING COMPANY is mad as heck at a security researcher for highlighting a security problem without asking its consent first. Or something.

    The company in question is uKnowkids and its target is a chap called Chris Vickery, a security researcher. His crime? Security research.

    uKnowKids.com is a kind of virtual Mary Poppins. It does not put children in danger, like Mary Poppins, but it does look out for them and keep an eye on what they do by monitoring their communications and stuff.

    We imagine that in some circumstance it has got some children in trouble. This week it is getting an older person in trouble, and accusing a security researcher of hacking as opposed to security researching.

  • URL shortening – are these services now too big a security risk to use?

    Spammers and malware pushers are still heavily abusing URL shortening services, messaging security firm Cloudmark has reported in its 2015 annual security report (reg required). The popular Bit.ly service has recently become a particular favourite with criminals with 25,000 individual malicious links run though that service every single day in recent times. This sounds alarming but it gets worse. According to the firm, this meant that an extraordinary 97 percent of Bit.ly links now led to malicious websites.

More in Tux Machines

Conversation With Jonathan Thomas of OpenShot

I think my initial fascination with Linux was based on rebuilding all my old, broken computers laying around my office/garage. I was having a ton of fun, pulling components out of old computers, installing various distros and seeing what worked/didn’t work. And then there was the 3D desktop cube, which was pretty awesome! Pretty soon I had built my kids their own computer, with “safe” web-browsing, education games, etc. It was many months of playing around with Linux before I learned about Python and started slowly getting more into the programming side of things. Read more

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Linux Is Coming Soon with Mesa 3D 12.0, Latest KDE Goodies

Kate Lebedeff from the OpenMandriva project informed Softpedia about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) development build of the upcoming OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 operating system. Read more

Korora 24 "Sheldon" Linux Is Available Only for 64-bit PCs, Based on Fedora 24

After a long wait, the Korora 24 GNU/Linux distribution has been released, based, as its version number suggests, on many of the technologies included in the popular Fedora 24 operating system. Read more

Women In Tech: Jane Silber, CEO Of Canonical

When I sat down to interview Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical, I don’t think it was lost on either of us that our ability to chat freely even though I was in my office in the middle of the U.S. and she was in her office in London, England had everything to do with cloud computing, an area in which her company does brisk business. Silber has been running Canonical (maker of Ubuntu, among a great many other software products) in one form or another for well over a decade at this point, first as COO and now CEO. She answers questions thoughtfully, with carefully chosen words; even though I’m sure I’m not the first journalist to ask her some of the below questions (maybe not even the first one this week), she had no canned responses, and she never veered off course to discuss her own agenda. There were no preset talking points; simply, I asked questions, and she answered them. Read more