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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • BeeGFS Parallel File System Now Open Source
  • Let's meet the 2016 OSI Board of Directors candidates!

    The nominations for the Open Source Initiative board of directors closed on February 15th and we are delighted to share our list of candidates with you!

    We are excited that so many people want to take part, and as such would like to introduce you to the candidates before voting opens on February 29th.

  • Introducing motranslator

    What changes you can expect? First of all it supports all current PHP versions. It also performs way better - in my tests loading of mo file is 4-5 times faster and memory consumption went down about 10 percent. You can additionally use object API instead of traditional function based.

  • LibreOffice 5.1 Videos: Analytics

    For LibreOffice 5.1 we created a playlist of short videos highlighting some of the new features in action. At the time of writing, these videos have been viewed over 50,000 times in total. Here’s the breakdown:

    Calc: 15,346
    Impress: 12,275
    Writer: 25,229

  • DragonFlyBSD Intel Graphics Driver Gets BXT Support, Aims For A Blob-Free Skylake

    Thanks to the fabulous open-source graphics driver porting work done by François Tigeot, the DragonFlyBSD kernel's i915 Intel DRM graphics driver is up to a comparable state to the code ported from the Linux 4.2 kernel.

    Just months ago the i915 DragonFlyBSD graphics driver was years behind the upstream Linux kernel while in recent times a lot of headway has been made where the Intel graphics driver on this BSD operating system is just a few releases behind the upstream state.

  • Can we tackle the Zika virus with rapid, open research?

    One of the major issues with the Zika virus is that so little is known about it. That means that a lot of research has to be done very quickly.

    The Zika virus is at the heart of a global health emergency. It became a global health emergency after outbreaks began in 2015, and has possible links to birth defects. When the virus was first discovered in the late forties, human infections had been observed as early as 1952 according to Wikipedia.

  • Portugal adds 20 eGovernment service access points

    The government of Portugal has opened another 20 Espaços do Cidadão (Citizen Spots), in town halls across 8 of its 18 districts. There are now almost 200 such eGovernment service access points across the country. Here citizens can go online to renew driving licences, apply for permits and request official documents.

  • Flanders services exchange eGovernment practices

    Municipalities and public service organisations in Belgium’s Flanders region are exchanging their eGovernment practices and ICT policies. Many municipalities are considering an overhaul of their websites in order to improve eGovernment services, reports the region’s ICT Organisation (V-ICT-OR). Additionally, local administrations are looking for solutions to manage meeting minutes, and want to boost IT security, V-ICT-OR says.

  • Portugal to monitor public health through a national open data portal

    The National Health Service in Portugal (SNS – Serviço Nacional de Saüde) has set up an open data portal whose goal is to provide a dashboard to monitor the health of Portuguese people. Called Transparencia (Transparency), the portal gathers operational data generated or collected by the agencies of the national health system.

  • President Obama Nominates New Librarian Of Congress Who Supports Open Access, Fights Against Surveillance

    So here's a pleasant surprise. President Obama has nominated Carla Hayden as the new Librarian of Congress, and at a first glance, she looks perfect for the job. The job is super important for a whole variety of reasons, including that the Librarian of Congress controls the Copyright Office (more on that in a bit...). The former Librarian of Congress, James Billington, was really bad. He apparently was mostly focused on hobnobbing with rich people in fancy places around the globe than doing anything useful. A report by the Government Accountability Office found a massive leadership vacuum with Billington when it came to technology issues, noting that he basically ignored technology entirely. When Billington announced he was retiring, the Washington Post reported that employees were absolutely elated...

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  1. How to install Hugin panoramic image editor on Linux

    Hugin is an open-source image editing tool for Linux, Mac OS, Windows, and BSD. It allows users to stitch photographs together and create panoramas digitally. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install Hugin on Linux.

  2. How to play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux

    Total War: WARHAMMER II is the sequel to Total War: WARHAMMER. It is a turn-based real-time tactics video game developed by Creative Assembly and published by Sega. Here’s how you can play the game on your Linux system.

  3. How to Use the Linux Screen Command

    In Linux, you often need to run lengthy processes to execute in the background and independently (such as ping commands to a server for an extended period of time) .

  4. How to install VRoid Studio 1.0 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install VRoid Studio 1.0 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  5. How to Run Multiple Commands in Linux at Once

    The Linux terminal is a powerful tool that allows you to perform a wide range of operations using commands. These commands enable you to accomplish a variety of computing tasks, including file manipulation, program management, and service automation. Ideally, when you need to run a bunch of terminal commands, you do it one-by-one. However, it turns out that there's a better way to do this, and it involves running multiple commands at once. Follow along as we demonstrate the different ways to run multiple terminal commands in Linux.

  6. Easily Install and Setup PowerDNS on Debian 11/Debian 10 - kifarunix.com

    This tutorial is about how to easily install and setup PowerDNS on Debian 11/Debian 10. PowerDNS “is a premier supplier of open source DNS software, services and support“. It provides both the Authoritative Server and the Recursor DNS products.

KDE/Ken Vermette: New Icons, Iconoclast Pipeline

As was the method for Blue Ocean on the desktop widgets and design, the icons will be a gradual rollout over a few releases. We do have a strategy in place to ensure that this won’t be too jarring or inconsistent during the transition. The current plan is to update both all mimetypes and all places in time for the 5.24 release. Like our current icons the new icons have adaptive capabilities. Beyond that some additional select icons such as the new desktop icon are also adaptive, and there are plans for other icons to also take advantage of this feature where it would not be obnoxious. Compared to existing icons the refreshed content will be softer, more detailed, and less flat. These icons are also prepared with future capabilities in mind, and as enhancements are made to KDE Frameworks these icons may expose new and interesting features. Finally, we’re expanding the number of sizes the icons come in, so they look ideal at more zoom levels in your file browser. Currently colour places icons are offered in 32, 48, 64, and 96 pixel sizes, and mimetypes are offered in 32 and 64 pixel sizes. Refreshed icons in both places and mimetypes will be offered in 32, 48, 64, 96, 128, and 256 pixel sizes with no missing graphics. We already have all folders in all of the above sizes, and in under a month while also writing our software we have over doubled the number of folder icons in Breeze. We’re estimating we will more than triple in the number of mimetype icons. To get this work done we’ve built new tools for the express purpose of making mass iconography far easier for even individual artists, so I’m very pleased to state that a new icon and SVG pipeline is underway and despite being unfinished is producing results. This Python-written pipeline is capable of adding guides, rulers, and setting up grids for existing icons, standardizing existing icon colours, assembling entirely new icons from templates and components, and aggressively optimizing icons. With this authors will be able to have a “golden copy” of their icon sets where they can focus purely on design, letting the software take care of cleaning up the documents and assembling the individual pieces. The folders in the above image were assembled by the pipeline, with no hand-tuning. Read more

Seaberry Turns A Raspberry Pi 4 Into A Linux Powered ITX System

Since it’s inception the Raspberry Pi has evolved from it’s start as a nifty sounding hobby board to a rather powerful multi-core small form factor computer which is capable of quite a lot. The enhancement to it’s capabilities has continued to expand at a pace roughly equal to it’s growing popularity, to the point where there is an effective compute module which can be added to the your Pi to give it more versatility. Thanks to the compatibility improvements for that computer module we will see in 5.16 release of the Linux kernel, the Raspberry Pi will be capable of yet another impressive feat with the help of a product from a Canadian company called ALFTEL. Their Seaberry Compute Module 4 carrier board will give your Raspberry Pi 4 PCIe support. Once attached, your Pi will have access to a variety of PCIe interfaces including a 16x slot with a single PCIe lane, four PCIe 1x Mini slots, four M.2 Key E with two lanes each and one single lane PCIe M.2 Key M port. Read more

GhostBSD 21.11.24 ISO is now available

This new ISO contains kernel, OS, and software updates. In addition, I added a new command-line software called ghostbsd-version that gives you the GhostBSD version, FreeBSD version, kernel version, and OS version. At the date of this release, if you run ghostbsd-version or ghostbsd-version -v, it should output 21.11.24. This version number will be increment by the date of new packages built on packages every update performed. The ISO version is now following the last package's build version instead of an ISO's build date in the hope of removing confusion about the ISO version. Read more