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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Mozilla Introduces Surveillance Principles for a Secure, Trusted Internet

    Security is paramount to a trusted Internet. Encryption is a critical part of how that trust is made real. The recent events around Apple and the FBI set a dangerous precedent. Our position on these issues is simple: the FBI should not be able to require a technology company to create code that “undoes” years of security enhancements by creating additional vulnerabilities.

  • Hadoop, Spark, Deep Learning Mesh on Single GPU Cluster

    When it comes to leveraging existing Hadoop infrastructure to extend what is possible with large volumes of data and various applications, Yahoo is in a unique position–it has the data and just as important, it has the long history with Hadoop, MapReduce and other key tools in the open source big data stack close at hand and manned with seasoned experts.

  • Yahoo brings deep learning framework to Spark

    Yahoo has released CaffeOnSpark, which brings the fruits of two University of California, Berkeley projects together: vision-focused deep learning framework Caffe, and Big Data processing engine Apache Spark.

  • EnterpriseDB Announces Rise in Government Adoption of Postgres Across Global Markets

    Open source policy initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia are transforming government IT worldwide as agencies shift from costly traditional databases to EDB Postgres™

  • Facebook Pushes Open Source Wireless with Telecom Infra Project

    A new initiative by Facebook aims to speed the development of wireless networks by promoting more open source network components. The social network announced the launch of the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) at Mobile World Congress taking place in Barcelona this week. Several hardware companies such as Nokia and Intel, as well as wireless providers like Deutsche Telekom and SK Telecom have signed on to the project.

  • One month until LibrePlanet! Pre-order t-shirts through February 28th

    Along with our partners at MIT's Student Information Processing Board (SIPB), we are gearing up for the biggest LibrePlanet ever. Hundreds of people have already registered to attend, and we don't want you to miss out on your chance to be there.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy Says ZFS Ubuntu Implementation Is Not Legal

    Software Freedom Conservancy group has issued a statement saying that the recent implementation of ZFS in Ubuntu is actually a GPS violation. The truth seems to be a matter of perspective.

  • Why Sci-Hub is the true solution for Open Access: reply to criticism

    This article is to reply to some points made by publishers as well as some librarians who don’t like what Sci-Hub is doing to their job now.

    I will start with an article published last wekk by Ernesto Priego Signal, Not Solution: Notes on Why Sci-Hub Is Not Opening Access

    The title is misleading by itself, if not funny. Sci-Hub is not a signal: for many researchers out there in the world, Sci-Hub is the only solution available to access articles. I can support my words by providing letters I received as well as some statistics, but I will do this in future posts. The problem are paywalls, and Sci-Hub is a tool that solves this problem. A signal is when someone talks about the problem of paywalls, like many OA advocates do. What differentiates Sci-Hub from this talk, is that Sci-Hub not talking, but actually solving this problem, providing access to those researchers who need it, including myself.

  • Matt Adereth's open source 3D printed ergonomic Dactyl Keyboard is truly amazing

    Without being noticed, keyboards have actually become one of the most important tools in our society and economy. There’s at least one in very home, office, store and school: a keyboard is truly universal. That reliance on this clever tool has already led to the development of various forms of ergonomic keyboards: keyboards that decrease the likelihood of developing wrist or hand related injuries, such as RSI. You’ve probably seen them or even worked on one: they tend to have a curve in the middle to more naturally accommodate the wrists. However, Matt Adereth has been working on a far more original model with the help of 3D printing: the Dactyl keyboard, that actually consists of two completely separate, curved keyboard segments.

  • A Slew of Open-Source Synthesizers

    To install on an Arduino UNO, fetch the zip file from this GitHub repository, and move each subfolder to your Arduino sketch directory. You’re ready to play along.

More in Tux Machines

Filesystem Hierarchy Standard

If you are new to the Linux command line, you may find yourself wondering why there are so many unusual directories, what they are there for, and why things are organized the way they are. In fact, if you aren't accustomed to how Linux organizes files, the directories can seem downright arbitrary with odd truncated names and, in many cases, redundant names. It turns out there's a method to this madness based on decades of UNIX convention, and in this article, I provide an introduction to the Linux directory structure. Although each Linux distribution has its own quirks, the majority conform (for the most part) with the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS). The FHS project began in 1993, and the goal was to come to a consensus on how directories should be organized and which files should be stored where, so that distributions could have a single reference point from which to work. A lot of decisions about directory structure were based on traditional UNIX directory structures with a focus on servers and with an assumption that disk space was at a premium, so machines likely would have multiple hard drives. Read more

Games: Terminal, Donensbourgh, Voxel Tycoon, SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, Truck the System, RPCS3 and Thrive

  • 5 command-line games for sysadmins
    Just because you prefer working in a text-mode interface doesn't mean you're not entitled to a little fun here and there. Last December, I took some time out before the holidays to explore some of my favorite command-line diversions into a series for Opensource.com. It ended up being a bit of an advent calendar for terminal toys, and I got some great suggestions from readers. Now summer has arrived, at least for us in the northern hemisphere, and for many of this means a time of summer breaks, vacations, and generally trying to fit in a little relaxation between committing code and closing tickets. So to that end, I thought I'd revisit five of my favorite command-line games from that series, and share them here with you on Enable Sysadmin.
  • Donensbourgh, a medieval farming RPG that could be one to watch has Linux support
    Currently in the early stages but it seems promising, Donensbourgh is a medieval RPG with no violence or combat of any kind for those after perhaps a more relaxing experience. I'm glad developers take risks and make games like this, as I do enjoy games with plenty of combat but I often find there's not enough outside of that. Sadly, it seems they don't do their development videos showcasing gameplay in English so I've not a clue what they're saying.
  • An early build of the tycoon strategy game 'Voxel Tycoon' will release on itch.io later this month
    Voxel Tycoon, another in-development indie game that will have Linux support is arriving soon with an early build. What exactly is it? The developer says it's a "tycoon strategy game about transportation, building factories, and mining in a beautiful voxel landscapes" which sounds interesting. Even more interesting perhaps, is their claim that it will include "all-new features never before seen in the genre". I'm keen to see if it will live up to that in any way, so I will be taking a look when it's ready.
  • SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG
    SteamWorld Quest: Hand of Gilgamech, the fun card-based tactical RPG from Image and Form (developer) and Thunderful (publisher) can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG.
  • Truck the System, an upcoming game about building trucks and then racing them sounds amusing
    Currently in development by UK developer jorgen games (hooray, a fellow Brit!), Truck the System is a slightly unusual racing game that's coming to Linux. It's not a standard racing game like Dirt or Grid as you will be actually building your vehicle, possibly adding a bunch of weapons and then race or fight your way to the finish. Sounds like it could be a lot of fun! There's no full trailer yet since it's still in development but here's a few quick clips to give you an idea:
  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 has a new report out, over 40% of listed games now "Playable"
    RPCS3, the very impressive PlayStation 3 emulator continues advancing quickly with the team putting up a new report. This latest report covers April, with the delay being due to not having enough contributors. They're actually looking for help writing them, which you can apply for here.
  • Thrive, a free and open source game about the evolution of life
    Thrive [Official Site] is a game I came across years ago, a game about the evolution of life with you starting as a tiny Microbe and eventually working up to something more complex. That idea might sound familiar and for good reason, as it was originally inspired by the game Spore. However, they're attempting to go a little further by being scientifically accurate and have the evolution play-out across both you and everything around you.

Hack Computer review

I bought a hack computer for $299 - it's designed for teaching 8+ year olds programming. That's not my intended use case, but I wanted to support a Linux pre-installed vendor with my purchase (I bought an OLPC back in the day in the buy-one give-one program). I only use a laptop for company events, which are usually 2-4 weeks a year. Otherwise, I use my desktop. I would have bought a machine with Ubuntu pre-installed if I was looking for more of a daily driver. Read more

KIT Scenarist is a Powerful Tool for Creating Screenplays

KIT Scenarist is an open source software for creating screenplays. You can use it for creating stories from the birth of the idea and before the transfer of the script to production. Read more