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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Reading comprehension is a big problem in open-source

    Houston, we have a problem. Linux users can't read good [sic]. Zoolander reference. Word. What am I on about, and where can you buy some of the stuff, you be asking? You can't, it's all au naturale, Dedoimedo freerange extract.

    To be serious, this topic is about the flow of information in the Linux world. After having a rather horrible autumn season of distro testing, I happened to come across commentary about my reviews on various forums and portal. It's always when the negative is being discussed, because articles that praise products never ever get any reaction from the wider community. To put it bluntly, the message was not coming across.

  • Cloud Explorer is back with v7.1

    Cloud Explorer is a open-source Amazon S3 client that works on any operating system. The program features a graphical or command line interface. Today I just released version 7.1 and hope that you give it a test drive. Feedback and uses cases are always encouraged.

  • How to land your first open source contribution, from your browser, in 15 minutes

    Mullenweg — a political science dropout whose software (Wordpress) now powers nearly a quarter of all websites — says that you can “100% compensate for a lack of professional experience” by proving your abilities through open source contributions.

  • Java finally gets microservices tools

    Lightbend, formerly known as Typesafe, is bringing microservices-based architectures to Java with its Lagom platform.

    Due in early March, Lagom is a microservices framework that lightens the burden of developing these microservices in Java. Built on the Scala functional language, open source Lagom acts as a development environment for managing microservices. APIs initially are provided for Java services, with Scala to follow.

  • documentation first

    I write documentation first and code second. I've mentioned this from time to time (previously, previously) but a reader pointed out that I've never really explained why I work that way.

    It's a way to make my thinking more concrete without diving all the way into the complexities of the code right away. So sometimes, what I write down is design documentation, and sometimes it's notes on a bug report[1], but if what I'm working on is user-visible, I start by writing down the end user documentation.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

An Early Look At Linux 4.16 Performance On Five Systems

Here are some preliminary benchmarks of the Linux 4.16 development kernel compared to Linux 4.15 stable on five different systems. Last week I began testing out the Linux 4.16 kernel on a few different boxes and it's been going rather well (sans the ongoing AMD Raven Ridge Linux issues...). For some initial Linux 4.16 kernel benchmarks I have results today to share for a Core i5 6600K, Core i7 6800K, Xeon E3-1280 v5, Core i9 7980XE, and Ryzen 7 1800X as a few of the available boxes for testing. Tests on other hardware and a greater variety of tests will be coming in the days and weeks ahead as Linux 4.16 continues to stabilize. Read more

Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

Oracle appears to have open-sourced DTrace, the system instrumentation tool that Sun Microsystems created in the early 2000s and which has been beloved of many-a-sysadmin ever since. As noted by developer Mark J. Wielaard, this commit by an Oracle developer shows that something is afoot. Read more

KDE receives 200,000 USD-donation from the Pineapple Fund

KDE e.V. is announcing today it has received a donation of 200,000 USD from the Pineapple Fund. With this donation, the Pineapple Fund recognizes that KDE as a community creates software which benefits the general public, advances the use of Free Software on all kinds of platforms, and protects users' privacy by putting first-class and easy to use tools in the hands of the people at zero cost. KDE joins a long list of prestigious charities, organizations and communities that the Pineapple Fund has so generously donated to. "KDE is immensely grateful for this donation. We would like to express our deeply felt appreciation towards the Pineapple Fund for their generosity" said Lydia Pinscher, President of KDE e.V.. "We will use the funds to further our cause to make Free Software accessible to everyone and on all platforms. The money will help us realize our vision of creating a world in which everyone has control over their digital life and enjoys freedom and privacy". Read more