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The March 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the March 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved.

In the March 2016 issue:

* Linux Anti Oops: How To Undelete Files
* LibreOffice 5.1: New Features, Faster Loading
* ms_meme's Nook: Off We Go
* PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: aguila
* GIMP Tutorial: Pop-Out Text
* Game Zone: Breach & Clear
* PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner: Overnight Orange and Vanilla Bean Sticky Buns
* An Upgrade Story For Your Reading Pleasure
* PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
* And much more inside!

This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Meemaw.

Download the PDF (7.7 MB)
http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-03.pdf

Download the EPUB Version (8.2 MB)
http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201603epub.epub

Download the MOBI Version (7.2 MB)
http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201603mobi.mobi

Visit the HTML Version
http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

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