Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE Makes the Desktop Practical Again

Filed under
KDE

Before the KDE 4.1 release in 2008, Aaron Seigo announced the end of desktop icons. He was being provocative, because what he was really announcing was the end of being restricted to a single icon set. Instead, KDE Plasma began supporting multiple desktops, and with them several ways to swap sets of icons in and out. These changes have received little publicity, but they are ideal for quickly customizing a desktop for a specialized task.

You do not have to use these features. However, if you choose to explore them, you can apply them not only to the main desktop, but also to any activities, or even any virtual workspaces, so long as you first select from the main menu System Settings > Workspace Behavior > Virtual Desktop > Different Widgets for each desktop. It's all a matter of which combination of customizations you prefer: a default desktop, folder views, multiple desktop folders, or a single desktop folder with filters.

Read more

Also:

  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Is Getting Ready With More Wayland Improvements

    KDE's Martin Gräßlin has provided a status update concerning KWin/Wayland support with the latest KDE stack.

    Martin Gräßlin has been spending most of his time recently focusing upon the KDE input support for Wayland and better supporting libinput. There's been a lot of code clean-ups and bug fixes as well as bringing input features closer to parity between X11 and Wayland.

  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Beta Released

    The KDE community has banded together to release the Plasma 5.6 beta today.

    KDE Plasma 5.6 is bringing improvements to the default Breeze theme as well as to the light and dark versions, task manager improvements, smoother widgets, a weather widget has finally returned to Plasma 5, and plenty of Wayland improvements. Plasma 5.6 has also been prepping Plymouth boot screen and GRUB boot-loader screens designed around the Breeze theme in aiming to complete the KDE computing experience.

  • Tumbleweed gets KDE app store

    Since the last update on openSUSE Tumbleweed, there have been five snapshots and some of those snapshots have brought some interesting new packages.

    The 20160225 snapshot allows Tumbleweed users to add a package called ‘discover‘, which is the KDE software installer, implemented as an app store like application.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

How to Apply Accent Colour in Ubuntu Desktop

A step-by-step tutorial on how to apply accent colour in Ubuntu desktop (GNOME) with tips for Kubuntu and others. Read more

The Wine development release 7.15 is now available.

The Wine development release 7.15 is now available.

What's new in this release:
  - Command lists in Direct2D.
  - RSA encryption.
  - Initial Wow64 thunking in WIN32U.
  - Optional support for colors in test output.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available at:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/7.x/wine-7.15.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read on

What Is Virtual Memory on Linux? How to Manage It

Virtual memory is a way of representing your memory that's abstracted from the physical memory on your machine. It makes use of both your RAM and your storage space, whether that's on a traditional hard drive or an SSD. In Linux, this is done at the kernel and hardware levels. The CPU has a piece of hardware called a Memory Management Unit (MMU) that translates physical memory addresses into virtual ones. These addresses are independent of where they physically reside on the machine. These address spaces are known as "pages" and they could be in RAM or on your hard drive or SSD. The OS sees these addresses as one big pool of memory, known as an "address space." Virtual memory takes advantage of the fact that not all of the memory that's being used in theory is being used all of the time. Programs in memory are broken down into pages and the parts that the kernel deems as unnecessary are "swapped out," or moved to the hard drive. When they're needed, they can be "swapped in," or brought back into RAM. The space used for virtual memory on a drive is known as "backing store," or "swap space." In the Windows world, it's usually implemented as a file, known as a "swap file." It's also possible to do this in Linux, but it's much more common to use a dedicated disk partition. Read on Also: nbdkit for macOS | Richard WM Jones