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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Shippable 4.0 Sets Sail with Improved Docker Integration

    The first thing users will notice about Shippable v4.0 is its increased flexibility. Developers can use the tools and platforms they’re working with currently to automate their build and deployment pipelines.

    “When you want to change tools or languages, move to a new technology like microservices or containers, or expand your deployment environment, you don’t have to start over again rebuilding your app delivery pipeline,” said Shippable CEO Avi Cavale.

    Recreating one’s system from the ground up can be a headache, one which Shippable hopes to curb with its improvements made to version 4.0 of the platform.

  • Transmission Torrent Client Gets First Update in Over 2 Years

    A new version of open-source BitTorrent client Transmission is now available to download.

  • Rhino Labs Announces SMB Entry Level Enterprise Linux Platforms to Support SDN, Security and IOT Applications

    Rhino Labs, a leading provider of high-performance data security, networking, and data infrastructure solutions, is announcing the SDNA-7100 (Software Defined Network Appliance) platform family, an entry level enterprise-grade platform able to perform multiple applications within a small form factor at low power and low cost. The SDNA-7100 appliance family is ideal for high performance applications, providing all-inclusive network connectivity, security and storage based solutions.

  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Beta Brings New Light Breeze Theme, Wayland Support, More

    KDE Plasma 5.6 Beta has been announced by the KDE community, marking the start of a new development cycle for the desktop.

    The new KDE Plasma 5.x branch wasn't all that well received by users when it was initially launched, but the developers continued to improve upon it. This latest 5.6 Beta release shows just how far the project has come. The progress made by the developers is astounding, and it looks like they are still making significant changes.

  • GNOME Maps 3.20 to Integrate Lots of New Features

    GNOME Maps 3.20 looks like it's going to be a great release and developers have added quite a few new features.

    When GNOME Maps was upgraded from 3.16 to 3.18, the jump wasn't all that obvious. Just a couple of new major features were added. On the other hand, the developers are now preparing for GNOME 3.20, and there's a lot more interesting stuff going on.

More in Tux Machines

Google’s Fuchsia OS on the Pixelbook: It works! It actually works!

Google currently has two OSes on the market: Android and Chrome OS. The company is never one to leave a successful product alone in the marketplace, though, so it's also developing a third operating system called "Fuchsia." When we last checked in on the experimental OS in May 2017, calling it an "OS" was a bit of a stretch. We only got the system UI up and running on top of Android, where it then functioned like an app. The UI offered a neat multi-window system, but mostly it was just a bunch of placeholder graphics. Nothing worked. It has been hard to check in on Fuchsia since. The Fuchsia system UI, which was written with a cross-platform SDK called "Flutter," quickly shut down the Android (and iOS) compatible builds. Fuchsia has a Vulkan-based graphics stack, and no emulator supports the new-ish graphics API. The only way to get Fuchsia up and running again was with actual hardware, and the only supported devices were Intel NUC PCs from 2015 and the Acer Switch Alpha 12 laptop. Read more

today's howtos

Games: Super Blood Hockey, Starship Titanic and More

Software: MenuLibre, Speech Recognition, "Just TODO It", Slack

  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released
    The wait is over. MenuLibre 2.1.4 is now available for public testing and translations! With well over 100 commits, numerous bug fixes, and a lot of polish, the best menu editing solution for Linux is ready for primetime.
  • Speech Recognition For Linux Gets A Little Closer
    t has become commonplace to yell out commands to a little box and have it answer you. However, voice input for the desktop has never really gone mainstream. This is particularly slow for Linux users whose options are shockingly limited, although decent speech support is baked into recent versions of Windows and OS X Yosemite and beyond. There are four well-known open speech recognition engines: CMU Sphinx, Julius, Kaldi, and the recent release of Mozilla’s DeepSpeech (part of their Common Voice initiative). The trick for Linux users is successfully setting them up and using them in applications. [Michael Sheldon] aims to fix that — at least for DeepSpeech. He’s created an IBus plugin that lets DeepSpeech work with nearly any X application. He’s also provided PPAs that should make it easy to install for Ubuntu or related distributions.
  • Announcing "Just TODO It"
    Recently, I wished to use a trivially-simple TODO-list application whilst working on a project. I had a look through what was available to me in the "GNOME Software" application and was surprised to find nothing suitable. In particular I just wanted to capture a list of actions that I could tick off; I didn't want anything more sophisticated than that (and indeed, more sophistication would mean a learning curve I couldn't afford at the time). I then remembered that I'd written one myself, twelve years ago. So I found the old code, dusted it off, made some small adjustments so it would work on modern systems and published it.
  • Linux users can now get Slack as a snap package
    Canonical has announced the general availability of the collaboration platform Slack, as a snap package. The move will allow Linux users to get setup with the platform and begin collaborating on their work more easily. Any Linux distribution with snap support can head over to the snapcraft website, download the package, and begin using it.