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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Shippable 4.0 Sets Sail with Improved Docker Integration

    The first thing users will notice about Shippable v4.0 is its increased flexibility. Developers can use the tools and platforms they’re working with currently to automate their build and deployment pipelines.

    “When you want to change tools or languages, move to a new technology like microservices or containers, or expand your deployment environment, you don’t have to start over again rebuilding your app delivery pipeline,” said Shippable CEO Avi Cavale.

    Recreating one’s system from the ground up can be a headache, one which Shippable hopes to curb with its improvements made to version 4.0 of the platform.

  • Transmission Torrent Client Gets First Update in Over 2 Years

    A new version of open-source BitTorrent client Transmission is now available to download.

  • Rhino Labs Announces SMB Entry Level Enterprise Linux Platforms to Support SDN, Security and IOT Applications

    Rhino Labs, a leading provider of high-performance data security, networking, and data infrastructure solutions, is announcing the SDNA-7100 (Software Defined Network Appliance) platform family, an entry level enterprise-grade platform able to perform multiple applications within a small form factor at low power and low cost. The SDNA-7100 appliance family is ideal for high performance applications, providing all-inclusive network connectivity, security and storage based solutions.

  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Beta Brings New Light Breeze Theme, Wayland Support, More

    KDE Plasma 5.6 Beta has been announced by the KDE community, marking the start of a new development cycle for the desktop.

    The new KDE Plasma 5.x branch wasn't all that well received by users when it was initially launched, but the developers continued to improve upon it. This latest 5.6 Beta release shows just how far the project has come. The progress made by the developers is astounding, and it looks like they are still making significant changes.

  • GNOME Maps 3.20 to Integrate Lots of New Features

    GNOME Maps 3.20 looks like it's going to be a great release and developers have added quite a few new features.

    When GNOME Maps was upgraded from 3.16 to 3.18, the jump wasn't all that obvious. Just a couple of new major features were added. On the other hand, the developers are now preparing for GNOME 3.20, and there's a lot more interesting stuff going on.

More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!
    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.
  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch
    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):
  • Getting ready for Stretch
    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)
    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you! Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.
  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9
    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC
    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows. I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.
  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land
    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things. Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain. Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots. Read more