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Korora Love, Why Wayland, Microsoft Monopoly

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Korora 23 was released February 7 and today Jack Germain said you'll love it. Matthias Clasen today blogged that Wayland would still not be the default in Fedora 24 and Ubuntu convergence is starting to impress. Tim Sweeney, founder Epic Games and creator Gears of War, said Microsoft is (shockingly) trying to create a monopoly and a new startup is creating something on which users can run their choice of Windows or Ubuntu.

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Games: Humble Store, Bully: Scholarship and DOSBox

  • Humble Store has a 'Tabletop Sale' going, some good Linux games on offer

    It's the start of another glorious week for Linux gaming and another big sale is going on again. Over on the Humble Store, they have a Tabletop Sale now live.

  • How to play Bully: Scholarship Edition on Linux

    Bully: Scholarship Edition is a remaster of Rockstar Game’s “Bully,” a game about a young kid working his way through the social hierarchy of high school, meeting girls, making friends, and causing mischief. The game is an open world, which is typical of Rockstar. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux PC.

  • DOSBox – Run classic DOS games on your Linux PC

    DOSBox is an open-source software that creates a virtual MS-DOS compatible environment, including sound, graphics, and basic networking. It enables you to run DOS applications without any modifications. Using this wonderful app, you can run your classic DOS games and compilers like Wolfenstein 3D, Prince of Persia, Turbo C++, and MASM on your Linux PC. DOSBox makes use of Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL), a library designed to allow low-level access to hardware components like a mouse, keyboards, sound system, and graphics. It has made the whole process of porting easier to various platforms. Currently, DOSBox runs on several platforms like different Linux, Windows, and macOS.

The CLA Denial-Of-Service attack

Obviously, there's a flaw in that logic. A CLA is an agreement between a project and a (new) contributor. A project does not absolutely requires the contributor to sign the agreement to accept its contributions, in theory. It's the reverse: for the contributor to have their patch accepted, they need to accept the CLA. But the project could accept contributions without CLA without violating the law. But it seems that projects sometimes end up doing a DOS on themselves by refusing perfectly fine contributions from drive-by contributors who don't have time to waste filling forms on all projects they stumble upon. In the case of this typo, I could have submitted a patch, but because I didn't sign a CLA, again, the project couldn't have merged it without breaking their own rules, even if someone else submits the same patch, after agreeing to the CLA. So, in effect, I would have DOS'd the project by providing the patch, so I just opened an issue which strangely — and hopefully — isn't covered by the CLA. Read more

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