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Godot Engine - Multiplayer in Godot 4.0: Scene Replication (part 1)

It's finally time for the long-awaited post about the new multiplayer replication system that is being developed for Godot 4.0. Below, we will introduce the concepts around which it was designed, the currently implemented prototype, and planned changes to make it more powerful and user-friendly.

Design goals
Making multiplayer games has historically been a complex task, requiring ad-hoc optimizations and game-specific solutions. Still, two main concepts are almost ubiquitous in multiplayer games: some form of messaging, and some form of state replication (synchronization and reconciliation). While Godot does provide a system for messaging (i.e. RPC), it does not provide a common system for replication. In this sense, we had quite a few #networking meetings in August 2021 to design a replication API that could be used for the common cases, while being extensible via plugins or custom code. Read more

ColorTint Adds Translucent Overlay To Help People with Dyslexia, Scopic Sensitivity

For people with dyslexia, scopic sensitivity, and related conditions, GNOME has an extension to adds a a translucent colored overlay over your desktop that may help. It’s ‘ColorTint’ that adds an indicator applet in system tray area. User may click the drop down menu options to enable/disable the overlay, change the color via RGB slider bar, and adjust transparency via the Alpha slider. Read more

Android Leftovers

What Is Linux and Why Is It Important?

Linux is technically not a desktop operating system, but a kernel. The kernel is the part of your computer that enables physical hardware to communicate with what’s on-screen. The kernel is the reason text appears when you type, the cursor moves when you stroke the touchpad, and images appear on your monitor. In the early days of computing, programmers freely shared code and programs. This started to change when corporate entities like IBM, Apple, and Microsoft started to release copyrighted code that users couldn't view and came with restrictions on use. In response, the GNU Project was formed as an effort to create a fully functional computer powered by software that was still freely shared and distributed. Read more