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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • PlayStation 4 capable of booting Linux due to the latest hack

    This is not the first time that fail0verflow announced it had successfully hacked Sony’s PlayStation 4 to run Linux, and even showcased to the public that the team was running Pokémon. After months of testing, the team has said that the console is successfully able to run Linux, but what does this mean for the future gaming titles. Does this mean that Sony’s PlayStation 4 will be open to run pirated copies of future games? The hacking group has not stated this, but has shown us on how we too can run Linux on our consoles.

  • Radeon Crimson 16.3 Released With Vulkan, But No Sign Yet For Linux

    Today AMD released the Radeon Software Crimson Edition 16.3 driver (formerly known as Catalyst), but sadly the Linux driver update is not in tandem with this new driver update which now provides official Vulkan support.

    When hearing that Radeon Software Crimson 16.3 brings official Vulkan support over their earlier Windows beta, I was excited and hoping the Linux release would join in. The release notes also mention some performance improvements with this Crimson 16.3 driver and other enhancements to complement the Vulkan mainline API support.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6 Offers Improved Performance, Scale and Security for High-Performance Linux-Based Workloads

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.6. This new version of Red Hat’s KVM-based virtualization solution offers increased performance, scale, and security for high-intensity Linux workloads. It also updates user experience and management tools to help reduce cost and time of VMware migrations by eliminating the need to purchase a third-party migration tool. Lowering the costs and sprawl of proprietary virtualization solutions is a common customer challenge addressed by Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization.

  • Large Cap Key Stocks of the Day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Tails 2.2 Comes with Onion Circuits Instead of Vidalia

    Have you ever wondered how to access the internet anonymously or protecting your privacy against internet surveillance! without the effort of setting up a VPN and relay connections. Tails Linux distribution is a quite good choice for you.

    During your regular usage to the internet, you regularly send application tracking reports, search engine queries, browsing history, your location based on the current IP address, ..etc. All these kind of information could be used to invade your privacy. So, you could use an applications called “Tor” to connect you through multiple virtual tunnels and relays to hide your identity and your location. This seems pretty good, but what if you don’t want to bother with setting up Tor in your current Linux distribution, you could simply use a live session of Tails directly from a USB, DVD, and SD card.

  • Linaro Connect: Jon Masters talking about the importance of standards
  • Raspberry Pi 3

    Four years ago (last leap day to be specific), the first Raspberry Pi was released. And on February 29, 2016, the third version made its debut.

    In its short lifespan, the Pi has broken records to become the best-selling British computer. With more than eight million units in circulation, it has eclipsed the sales records set by Sinclair, Amstrad and Acorn. Back in the 1980s, those companies were at the forefront of the "microcomputer revolution".

More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.