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Linux expert sees expanded role for Ubuntu on the server

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After rave reviews as a desktop OS, Ubuntu Linux is finally attracting the support of developers as a server platform. The expanded sphere of influence for this free operating system is due in part to a renewed effort by developers like Benjamin Mako Hill -- he goes by Mako -- who promote the server side components of the latest Ubuntu release, version 6.06, as a viable alternative to its proprietary counterparts.

Mako is one of the founding members of the Ubuntu project, and today he has returned to graduate school at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Mass., where he works on the One Laptop per Child project -- an ambitious program with a goal to deliver millions of $100 laptops, equipped with Linux, to the developing nations of the world. A member of the Ubuntu Community Council governance board, Mako is also a co-author of The Official Ubuntu Book, available this month from Prentice Hall.

Mako took a break from his work on Ubuntu this week to speak with about the challenges of generating a community, Ubuntu's server-side additions and the possibility of wide-scale enterprise deployment of this popular OS.

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