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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Introducing plasma timekeeper – an applet measuring your activity

    Have you ever wondered how much time do you spend reading emails, browsing on internet or hacking? I have! I started thinking about monitoring my activity. Reason for this was that I work from home, where I’m alone and nobody is behind my back watching what I’m actually doing. So I came with an idea to write a simple applet which tracks the time you spent in a certain application by just checking your currently active window (application). The functionality is pretty simple, you switch focus to a window where you do something, the applet starts measuring the time and update it in some interval until you switch to another window and so on. It may not be accurate in case you will be cheating, e.g. you open a video player and start watching a movie while you switch focus to another app to avoid monitoring time spent in the video player. Given this, the purpose of the applet is pretty obvious, it should be just for you, for your personal usage when you have no reason for cheating, because you are interested in these statistics.

  • How much is 1 TeV?

    We are about half way trough this WTL Sprint @CERN, so I’ve decided to post something about my experience. Actually in this post I do not want to talk about our work, probably I’ll dedicate another article to it at the end of this week, but about one of the talks we had the opportunity to listen. On monday Ezio Todesco (CERN) gave us a talk about CERN history and magnets in LHC.

  • Under the Weather

    The first is weather! It was previously announced that Plasma 5.6 will be seeing the return of the weather widget. Lots of design work and planning has been done for it and while not everything we discussed will make it in for this release I do happily get to show off our new Breeze weather icons;

  • digiKam Recipes 4.11.1 Released

    A new release of digiKam Recipes is ready for your reading pleasure. This version introduces the Basic Concepts Explained appendix that covers key terms and concepts used in digiKam. Currently, the appendix contains information about chroma subsampling, cor (bit) depth, hue, saturation, brightness, and vibrance. I plan to gradually expand the appendix with time.

  • conf.KDE.in 2016, Jaipur

    Thank you KDE India for inviting us to share our experience with 250+ budding developers and spreading the knowledge we have acquired during our projects. It was beyond just a meetup, we made many new friends and also learnt a lot from each other. I would also like to thank LNMIIT for hosting such an amazing conference and for the flawless hospitality.

  • Hug the LHC

    We passed through retina based authentication, elevators up to 80 meters high, and at the end of the cave there it was: the CMS gigantic machine.

    After the hardware stuff under the ground we saw the data center (#1 level of triggering) and the control room, where we found Plasma 4.2 running on those machines!

  • That’s over 200 Petabytes!

    Today, on the third day of the WikiToLearn Sprint at CERN hosted by KDE e.V., we had the pleasure of listening to an interesting and inspiring lecture by Professor Pere Mato Villa, who talked about Computing for Data Processing and Analysis at CERN. In approximately one hour, we were enlightened on the techniques and methods in use in the various LHC experiments to acquire and process raw data from detectors. He also explained the massive extent of the IT infrastructure that’s needed to host all the data: currently all the LHC experiments rely on distributed computing resources, accounting for roughly 350,000 CPU cores, and 400 PB of disk and tape storage combined. That’s a huge one!

  • Workaround for trouble with updating akonadi tables
  • C++ and KDE in CERN

    Some time ago, I saw that CERN people had their own clang tree with a few addons, most notable one being the C++ REPL (C++ interpreter) called cling.

    Now we had a presentation by Pere Mato from CERN who talked about their ROOT data analysis framework. It seems like a really nice and powerful piece of software.

    The software is around 50 million lines of code, mostly C++. Some of it is python, but it is only used for quick-and-dirty testing of new ideas.

  • Wiki Reorganisation

    A group of us at the CERN-based cross-team sprint are attempting to tame the wilderness of the KDE wikis – at least, TechBase and Community.

    A little bit of history is needed here. Originally, TechBase was the only wiki, and it quickly became a dumping ground for pretty much everything. At some point, the other two wikis (Community and UserBase) were created so we could separate things out a bit, and people wanting tutorials for how to create Plasmoids, for example, wouldn’t be overwhelmed with meeting notes from the Plasma team.

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Today in Techrights

Don’t be a stranger to GIMP, be GIMP…

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