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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Introducing plasma timekeeper – an applet measuring your activity

    Have you ever wondered how much time do you spend reading emails, browsing on internet or hacking? I have! I started thinking about monitoring my activity. Reason for this was that I work from home, where I’m alone and nobody is behind my back watching what I’m actually doing. So I came with an idea to write a simple applet which tracks the time you spent in a certain application by just checking your currently active window (application). The functionality is pretty simple, you switch focus to a window where you do something, the applet starts measuring the time and update it in some interval until you switch to another window and so on. It may not be accurate in case you will be cheating, e.g. you open a video player and start watching a movie while you switch focus to another app to avoid monitoring time spent in the video player. Given this, the purpose of the applet is pretty obvious, it should be just for you, for your personal usage when you have no reason for cheating, because you are interested in these statistics.

  • How much is 1 TeV?

    We are about half way trough this WTL Sprint @CERN, so I’ve decided to post something about my experience. Actually in this post I do not want to talk about our work, probably I’ll dedicate another article to it at the end of this week, but about one of the talks we had the opportunity to listen. On monday Ezio Todesco (CERN) gave us a talk about CERN history and magnets in LHC.

  • Under the Weather

    The first is weather! It was previously announced that Plasma 5.6 will be seeing the return of the weather widget. Lots of design work and planning has been done for it and while not everything we discussed will make it in for this release I do happily get to show off our new Breeze weather icons;

  • digiKam Recipes 4.11.1 Released

    A new release of digiKam Recipes is ready for your reading pleasure. This version introduces the Basic Concepts Explained appendix that covers key terms and concepts used in digiKam. Currently, the appendix contains information about chroma subsampling, cor (bit) depth, hue, saturation, brightness, and vibrance. I plan to gradually expand the appendix with time.

  • conf.KDE.in 2016, Jaipur

    Thank you KDE India for inviting us to share our experience with 250+ budding developers and spreading the knowledge we have acquired during our projects. It was beyond just a meetup, we made many new friends and also learnt a lot from each other. I would also like to thank LNMIIT for hosting such an amazing conference and for the flawless hospitality.

  • Hug the LHC

    We passed through retina based authentication, elevators up to 80 meters high, and at the end of the cave there it was: the CMS gigantic machine.

    After the hardware stuff under the ground we saw the data center (#1 level of triggering) and the control room, where we found Plasma 4.2 running on those machines!

  • That’s over 200 Petabytes!

    Today, on the third day of the WikiToLearn Sprint at CERN hosted by KDE e.V., we had the pleasure of listening to an interesting and inspiring lecture by Professor Pere Mato Villa, who talked about Computing for Data Processing and Analysis at CERN. In approximately one hour, we were enlightened on the techniques and methods in use in the various LHC experiments to acquire and process raw data from detectors. He also explained the massive extent of the IT infrastructure that’s needed to host all the data: currently all the LHC experiments rely on distributed computing resources, accounting for roughly 350,000 CPU cores, and 400 PB of disk and tape storage combined. That’s a huge one!

  • Workaround for trouble with updating akonadi tables
  • C++ and KDE in CERN

    Some time ago, I saw that CERN people had their own clang tree with a few addons, most notable one being the C++ REPL (C++ interpreter) called cling.

    Now we had a presentation by Pere Mato from CERN who talked about their ROOT data analysis framework. It seems like a really nice and powerful piece of software.

    The software is around 50 million lines of code, mostly C++. Some of it is python, but it is only used for quick-and-dirty testing of new ideas.

  • Wiki Reorganisation

    A group of us at the CERN-based cross-team sprint are attempting to tame the wilderness of the KDE wikis – at least, TechBase and Community.

    A little bit of history is needed here. Originally, TechBase was the only wiki, and it quickly became a dumping ground for pretty much everything. At some point, the other two wikis (Community and UserBase) were created so we could separate things out a bit, and people wanting tutorials for how to create Plasmoids, for example, wouldn’t be overwhelmed with meeting notes from the Plasma team.

More in Tux Machines

Mark McIntyre: How Do You Fedora?

Mark McIntyre is a geek by birth and Linux by choice. “I started coding at the early age of 13 learning BASIC on my own and finding the excitement of programming which led me down a path of becoming a professional coder,” he says. McIntyre and his niece are big fans of pizza. “My niece and I started a quest last fall to try as many of the pizza joints in Knoxville. You can read about our progress at https://knox-pizza-quest.blogspot.com/” Mark is also an amateur photographer and publishes his images on Flickr. Read more

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News