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Free Software Advocates Defend GPLv3

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Free software advocates are defending revisions to the General Public License, while critics emerge to oppose the most recent version.

The FSF and the Software Freedom Law Center released the second discussion draft of the GNU GPL version 3. The draft marks the halfway point of a yearlong public review process for proposing changes and finalizing the GPLv3.

Soon after its release, one of the highest profile software developers under the current license blasted the revisions and the process, saying it has not allowed for real opposition.

Linus Torvalds, who helped create the open source operating system Linux, also took issue with clauses that would restrict Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology when it is used to prevent people from sharing or modifying GPLv3-covered software.

David Sugar, whose works on the GNU Bayonne telephony platform has provided insights about the interaction of software and proprietary hardware systems, said the license allows him to offer others the same opportunities and freedoms he receives through GPL.

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