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Interview with Bill Gates

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Microsoft

abcnews has a transcript of the Peter Jennings interview with Sat^H^HBill Gates. I'd like to throw in some clever jabs and sarcastic remarks, but truth is I couldn't make it past the "Security is, I would say, our top priority because for all the exciting things you will be able to do with computers — organizing your lives, staying in touch with people, being creative — if we don't solve these security problems, then people will hold back."

So, I'm just biting my tongue... until I can stomach the rest...

More in Tux Machines

7 open source Q&A platforms

Where do you go when you have a question? Since humans began walking the earth, we've asked the people around us—our family, friends, neighbors, classmates, co-workers, or other people we know well. Much later came libraries and bookstores offering knowledge and resources, as well as access for anyone to come in and search for the answers. When the home computer became common, these knowledge bases extended to electronic encyclopedias shipped on floppy disks or CD-ROMs. Then, when the internet age arrived, these knowledge bases migrated online to the likes of Wikipedia, and search engines like Google were born with the purpose of making it easy for people to search for answers to their questions. Now, sites like StackOverflow are there to answer our software questions and Quora for our general queries. The lesson is clear, though. We all have questions, and we all want answers for them. And some of us want to help others find answers to their questions, and this is where self-hosted Q&A sites come in. Read more

The City of Dortmund continues its transition to open source software

Five years after the creation of its Open Source Working Group, the City of Dortmund published several reports on the “Investigation of the potential of Free Software and Open Standards”. The reports share the city of Dortmund’s open source policy goals as well as its ambition to create an alliance of municipalities in favour of open source software. Read more

CERN adopts Mattermost, an open source messaging app

The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has decided to discontinue the use of the Facebook collaboration app Workplace, instead opting to replace it with Mattermost, an open source messaging app. CERN switched to open source software after changes to Facebook’s solution subscription prices and possible changes in the data security settings. Read more

Programming/Development: PHP 8.0, WASMtime 0.12, Perl, Python, and java

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