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Hurts when vista boots you in the DRM's

With Microsoft building a lot around HDCP, DRM into vista and most LCD panels not supporting it, what will be the upgrade cost? Not only will I have to change the two new 20" goggle boxes I've just bought, I'll need to change the graphics card too. Granted, that’s if I want to use the PC for playing a DVD or listening to music which, from time to time I been known to do.

All of the whispers on the wind hint at a paradigm shift away from usual TV/DVD/VIDEO/Stereo setup to having the PC as the central multimedia hub, and Vista is supporting this with more checks than international arrivals at an American airport. All of this means what exactly? A move to streaming video, paid up front? Everything I watched, tracked, logged, recorded and profiled and then spammed? Not being able to play that CD with the compilation I burned from my original collection? What if there's a way to get the DVD to work? Well vista will downgrade the quality or completely block it. Hmm, how nice of them.

"It is strongly recommended that YPbPr not be promoted to users as a connection method to HD displays - customers will be unhappy when the PVP OPM component is required to tell the driver to constrict or even turn off HD analog YPbPr outputs.”

It all makes you wonder who is pushing this the hardest? Intel? Microsoft? Hollywood? I don't think it's just one driver; they all want to dip their hands in your pockets and exact every penny, even that one that fell through the hole into the lining! Not only that, if there’s nothing in your pockets they’ll send someone round to check the back of the sofa!

I don't mind things being protected, I don't mind paying for DVDs or CDs because after all, the artist needs to be kept in gold, houses, cars and planes. What I do object to is paying well over the odds for it. They don't need that many cars, homes and planes. The production of the content can’t be that expensive when, in less than a year, you'll find it laying sad and all alone in the bargain bin. Not only will I have to pay more for the content, "we have to charge more because the process is more complicated and you’re getting better quality" (Hmm, better quality? With the tripe around these days that’s a matter of opinion), but I am forced, yes FORCED to spend more money upgrading the hardware just so I can watch a movie in glorious HD, not because I want to watch it in HD but because now I have to!

How does Linux address the whole HDCP/DRM/HD fiasco? What are the propositions in the protected/restricted formats arena? Surely something must be planned, even if it is just to keep up with the modern demands and the changing rip-off world? How will Linux find it’s place when the PC does shift to become the central entertainment controller? Just wondered that's all, seeing as it's Friday lunchtime and I have a total lack of arse for anything work related especially with the weekend looming on the horizon and this being my first week back after the hols.

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