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Interview with Bill Gates

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Microsoft

abcnews has a transcript of the Peter Jennings interview with Sat^H^HBill Gates. I'd like to throw in some clever jabs and sarcastic remarks, but truth is I couldn't make it past the "Security is, I would say, our top priority because for all the exciting things you will be able to do with computers — organizing your lives, staying in touch with people, being creative — if we don't solve these security problems, then people will hold back."

So, I'm just biting my tongue... until I can stomach the rest...

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Browsing Google's Open-Source Projects and More

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Linux Foundation and HPE in Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative

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Five Open Source alternatives to Slack

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GitLab Liberates More Code

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