Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AMD Athlon 64 4800+ X2 - Dual Core CPU

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

On the 25th of April AMD announced loads of dual core stuff. Besides the launch of the dual core 8xx series Opteron it also announced the 2xx dual core Opteron and the dual core Athlon 64 X2. Today we’re a step closer to the launch of Athlon 64 X2 but it’s not here quite yet - you’ll have to wait until June for that pleasure. If only there was a large international IT trade show that started at the end of May why, that would be the perfect venue to announce a new processor.

Until the official launch happens we won’t be able to get our hands on a fully fledged Athlon 64 X2 PC, so what we have here is a technical preview based on an AMD press kit of an Asus A8N SLI Deluxe motherboard, an Athlon 64 X2 4800+ and 1GB of Corsair 3200XL Pro memory.

There are four processors in the Athlon 64 X2 family which share a number of features with each other, and with existing models of Athlon 64. Athlon 64 X2 continues to use socket 939, the fabrication process is 90nm (.09 micron) using SOI (Silicon on Insulator), the 128-bit memory controller is compatible with PC1600, PC2100, PC2700 and PC3200 DDR, although you’d be barking mad to use anything but top notch memory, and there’s one bi-directional 1GHz Hyper Transport link. This gives an effective data bandwidth of 14.4GB/sec (8GB/sec x1 HyperTransport link + 6.4GB/sec memory bandwidth). X2 has 64KB of L1 instruction and 64KB of L1 data cache, just like Athlon 64.

The second core raises the transistor count to 233.2 million, but thanks to the 90nm fabrication process the die size is only 199 square millimetres. Compare that to the 130nm SOI Athlon 64 4000+ and Athlon 64 FX-55 which have cores that use 105.9 million transistors but which have an area of 193 square mm and you’ll see what an effective die shrink can bring to the party.

The Athlon 64 X2 4800+ has a nominal operating voltage of 1.35-1.40V and a TDP (Thermal Design Power) of 110W which compares very favourably to the FX-55 at 104W and the 4000+ at 89W.

Add in support for SSE3 and a revised memory controller to help compatibility with a broader range of memory modules and what you’ve effectively got is a pair of the new Venice cores tied together with the dual Opteron crossbar.

Full Review.

More in Tux Machines

Radeon Gallium3D OpenGL Performance From Fedora 18 To Fedora 23

For those curious how the open-source Radeon Gallium3D driver has evolved over the past three years, I benchmarked every release from Fedora 18 through Fedora 23 on the same system while looking at the OpenGL Linux performance with an AMD Cypress GPU. Here is a look at the open-source Radeon driver performance evolution on Fedora Linux. Read more

KDE Applications 16.04 Suite for KDE Plasma 5.6 to Arrive on April 20, 2016

Thanks to Michael Larabel from Phoronix, who spotted this earlier, it would appear that KDE published a preliminary release schedule for its upcoming KDE Applications 16.04 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment. Read more

IBM and Linux

  • SCO v. IBM: Judge Rules for IBM in Interferance Claims
    Two SCO stories in a week? As Yogi Berra would say, it’s 2003 all over again. But this time with a big difference. It’s almost over. I told you on Monday that Judge David Nuffer with the US District Court in Utah had shot down SCO’s attempts to bring an action for Unfair Competition against IBM because the issue is already covered by another breach of contract claim by SCO. On Tuesday, Judge Nuffer issued a ruling on a pair of interference claims which effectively takes whatever winds were left out of SCO’s sails. Bankrupt SCO, of course, lost their big $1 billion case against IBM long ago when Novell, in a separate case, proved that it, and not SCO, owned the copyrights that SCO was suing over. But SCO’s been struggling to stay alive, hoping to at least win a few bucks from IBM as compensation for all it went through.
  • Linux, IBM Share Bold Vision for Hyperledger Project, a Blockchain Fabric for Business
    No longer a group of thinkers and entrepreneurs on the fringe, the proponents of blockchain technology are growing in number, boosted by new attention from the media, financial institutions, professional services firms and, most recently, major tech giants. The development comes amid reports that the blockchain market could expand to account for more business in the coming years, with Aite Group projecting it could be worth as much as $400m in annual business by 2019. However, how this market takes shape, and which technology providers start to generate actual revenue, is less clear given the variety of new projects arising – from consortiums composed of financial institutions to open-source collaborations. What's more, each of these groups boasts a who’s-who list of well-known backers.

Three nginx Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu OSes

Canonical published details in a security notice regarding a few nginx vulnerabilities that have been identified in Ubuntu 15.10, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS operating systems. Read more