Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gentoo Portage secrets

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

Gentoo Linux is perhaps the most-used source-based Linux distribution. One secret to its success is the powerful and handy Portage package management system. While Gentoo comes with extensive documentation covering most aspects of using Portage, the techniques described in Gentoo's handbook and other documentation are not always the most effective ones. Here are some insider tips that can greatly increase your productivity.

Search faster

Before you install a package, you usually look for it via Portage's search capabilities. Portage's emerge utility has --search and --searchdesc options, but using them is not enjoyable, because they take a long time to run. That's why we've seen the emergence of third-party search front ends for Portage, such as esearch and eix. Their common idea is to use their own search indexes to speed up searches. When using either utility, you have to rebuild the index after updating the Portage tree, and after installing and uninstalling software.

Of the two, eix works faster and has more capabilities. You can get information on the utility from its man page or by invoking eix --help. To use eix to search for a package whose name contains foo, simply invoke eix foo.

Eix is a very flexible tool. It can give you more information on packages than esearch or emerge -s. It can search through different fields (e.g. package name, category, or description), it can search for regular expressions or wildcard patterns, or do fuzzy searches, and its output can be configured for use in scripts.

Optimizing traffic usage

Full Story.

Great read

I never knew about esearch or eix, but after using them I know they will always be on my system. At least 3x faster than a simple emerge -s.

re: Great read

Yeah it is. I've used some of them before when I saw them mentioned in the forums, but I couldn't remember them too much longer. I still end up using emerge -s. Blushing

I'm gonna make me a cheat sheet this time! Big Grin

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?
    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report
    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)
  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO
    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay
    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week. Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework
    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.
  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed
    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.
  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here
    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.
  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)
    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published
    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.
  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan
    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.
  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"
    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil. Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.