Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Java on Linux vs MS-Win XP

Filed under
Just talk

I'm was at Superquest all last week. Superquest is an event for training computer science teachers to teach computer science. It's where we get together to share best practices in computer science education, and is generously funded by an industry trade group, the "Software Association of Oregon".

Superquest was being hosted at Western Oregon University, a small university at Monmouth, Oregon (about 20 miles from Salem which is Oregon's capital city).

I'm taking the Advanced Placement teacher training class for teaching Advance Placement Java, the language chosen by the College Board in the United States for the Advanced Placement Computer Science/Programming curriculum for high school students.

We're using the BlueJ IDE, an open source IDE used largely by educators for teaching Java.

The computer lab we were using at Western Oregon University had Windows XP on all the machines. The first day of class, I used Win-XP for a few minutes--but I just couldn't stand it anymore . . . I whipped-out my PCLinuxOS CD I'd brought along with me, and proceeded to install Linux on the machine.

Western Oregon University has lots of bandwidth going into its computer labs, so I then quickly run Synaptic and install all the updates. Then I go to BlueJ's site, and install the IDE. In a few minutes, I've got a well functioning Linux Desktop in front of me. I even plug-in my usb flash drive, and copy over my favorite Desktop wallpaper.

I'm not into benchmarking, but upon launching BlueJ, I couldn't help notice that it seemed much faster than it was under MS-Win. Since the guy next to me was running BlueJ under Win-XP on an identical machine, a rough comparison was easy.

I asked him to shut-down and restart his Win-XP machine, and I do the same on mine. After restart, we launch BlueJ at the same time. The results? On the Win XP machine, the launch to BlueJ ready screen was nearly 5 seconds. On my Linux machine, the launch to ready time was 1 second! Furthur repeats produced the same result.

The BlueJ IDE is written in Java itself. And while this is hardly a scientific comparison, it is a side-by-side comparison on identical equipment under identical circumstances.

Why is launching and executing a Java program so much faster under Linux than Win-XP? I don't know. In my more paranoid moments, I wonder if Microsoft has deliberately crippled the performance of Java under Win-XP. Microsoft hates the popularity of Java. It's not their own dot net platform, and we all know that Microsoft wants to own and control everything.

More in Tux Machines

PLASMA ACTIVE PORTED TO KF5

The GSoC might have come to an end, but I am very happy with the progress that we have made porting the Plasma Active to KF5. In my previous blogposts i have describe some of the stuff which they have been ported. So at the moment a lot of the basic features have come back to the Plasma Active, so yes it is at a usable state :) One of the big changes is that Nepomuk has been replaced with Baloo. Despite the fact that a lot of the Nepomuk stuff has been ported, there are still some things left, for example the timeline and tag support on the active-filebrowser. Read more

Mozilla Unveils $33 Intex Cloud FX Smartphone

Mozilla is targeting first time smartphone buyers who haven’t yet upgraded their basic feature phones because of high prices or technology specifications. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Jane Hsu, director of product marketing at Mozilla based in Taiwan, explains how the company was able to bring down the cost of smartphones and discusses Mozilla’s future plans. Read more

Appliance maker Electrolux joins IoT-focused AllSeen Alliance

The group is one of the more diverse consortiums, with members ranging from consumer electronics and chipset manufacturers to retailers and service providers. Primarily, work revolves around the AllJoyn open-source framework, which AllSeen said acts as a universal translator for objects and devices to interact. Read more

Linux Doesn't Need to Own the Desktop

The simple fact is that Linux has changed the world and been a tremendous success outside the desktop, and there is nothing wrong with that. Android is hardly the only Linux-based platform that has made a big mark. Linux is huge on servers, in embedded technology, and is a constant prompt for innovation on emerging platforms. Ubuntu is the most popular platform for building OpenStack deployments on. Supercomputers all over the world run Linux, and Chrome OS is based on it. So Linux is making a huge difference globally, and it is time for detractors to stop focusing exclusively on its status on the desktop. Read more