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How To Create Cool Effects in a Terminal

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HowTos

Ubuntu can be configured and managed from the desktop for the most part but occasionally, you may still have to open a terminal session to get some work done. I've spent a fair amount of time working with Debian so I'm used to opening a terminal, switching to root and typing apt-get update. One thing about the default term though is that it's boring. Just black text on a white background.

Fortunately, you don't have to live with it if you don't want to. It's easy to customize the terminal's appearance to suit your fancy.

NOTE: The following tutorial will teach you how to customize the terminal, not the terminal session. Once you complete this HOW TO, everytime you open the terminal, the appearance will be as you configured it.

This and other great tutorials at wiredwriter.net.

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